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New Testament

New Testament

Professor Bart D. Ehrman, Ph.D., M.Div.
The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

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New Testament

Course No. 656
Professor Bart D. Ehrman, Ph.D., M.Div.
The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
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3.9 out of 5
214 Reviews
66% of reviewers would recommend this series
Course No. 656
  • Audio or Video?
  • You should buy audio if you would enjoy the convenience of experiencing this course while driving, exercising, etc. While the video does contain visual elements, the professor presents the material in an engaging and clear manner, so the visuals are not necessary to understand the concepts. Additionally, the audio audience may refer to the accompanying course guidebook for names, works, and examples that are cited throughout the course.
  • You should buy video if you prefer learning visually and wish to take advantage of the visual elements featured in this course. The video version features illustrations of people and events, graphics, maps, portraits, and on-screen text enhances the presentation and reinforces key points.
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What Will You Learn?

  • Look at the historical background of early Christian and Greco-Roman society to gain deeper insights into the Gospels.
  • Study each of the four Gospels in depth, and explore non-canonical Gospels, including the Gnostic" Gospel of Thomas."
  • Dive into the history and influence of one of the most important biblical characters outside of Jesus: the apostle Paul.
  • Understand the use of symbols and historical context in the apocalyptic writings of the Book of Revelation.

Course Overview

Whether you consider it a book of faith or a cultural artifact, the New Testament is among the most significant writings that the world has ever known. Scarcely a single major writer in the last 2,000 years has failed to rely on the web of meaning contained in the New Testament to communicate. Yet the New Testament is also among the most widely disputed and least clearly understood books in history.

In these lectures Professor Bart D. Ehrman develops for you a carefully reasoned understanding of the New Testament—and the individuals and communities who created its texts.

Importantly, Professor Ehrman's approach is as an historian, and the course "suspends" belief or disbelief to understand how, when, why, and by whom the New Testament was written. He explains in detail the light that historical research brings to the texts. He also reviews key texts omitted from the New Testament.

"Our ultimate goal is to come to a fuller appreciation and understanding of these books that have made such an enormous impact on the history of Western civilization and that continue to play such an important role for people today," says Dr. Ehrman.

Bringing Scholarly Evidence to Bear

This course is designed to introduce the writings of the New Testament—the most widely read, quoted, studied, debated, maligned, and believed book in the history of Western civilization.

Many people remain unaware of how the New Testament was written and transmitted. This course draws on modern biblical scholarship, recent archaeological discoveries, and careful literary analysis to trace the history of the New Testament and of the early Christian faith community.

"The books of the New Testament," says Professor Ehrman, are "best understood when situated in their own historical context—rather than taken out of context."

Professor Ehrman has crafted this course as a historical introduction to the 27 books of the New Testament, to allow you to come to understand their content, meaning, and historical accuracy. The course will address such significant questions as:

  • Who wrote these books, under what circumstances, and for what audience?
  • What do the books of the New Testament say, what do they mean, and how historically accurate are they?
  • How can we can come to more fully appreciate and understand them?

Professor Ehrman is always mindful of the limitations imposed by the available data and methods. Consider just some of the difficulties faced by scholars of this work, as Dr. Ehrman notes:

"The earliest manuscript of any kind from the New Testament that we have is a tiny scrap that's about the size of a credit card. It's written on the front and back. It originally came from a full manuscript of the Gospel of John. This little fragment was probably produced in the early part of the 2nd century. Most scholars date this papyrus to around the year 125, give or take 25 years, so it could have been written as early as 100, possibly as late as the year 150."

Professor Ehrman brings impressive scholarly evidence to bear on the task of reconstructing the life and ministry of Jesus and the origins of Christianity in the decades before and during the composition of the books that make up the New Testament.

Appreciate the New Testament More Completely

Dr. Ehrman clearly orients you in the world of Greco-Roman pagan cults and the world of early Judaism—examining the beliefs, sacred spaces, liturgical practices, and distinguishing features of the religions surrounding the birth of Christianity.

The lectures lead you through each of the New Testament texts and their context—contrasting the varied portrayals of Jesus in the Gospels, each with its own perspective.

Each of the Gospels is also examined in the light of historical evidence and evaluation. The course examines the importance and context of Paul, the most significant figure in the rise of Christianity besides Jesus. The course ends with an exploration of the Book of Revelation.

The study of the New Testament in this course is broad and often surprising. Consider these themes from the course:

  • The earliest records of Jesus are probably right in portraying him as an apocalyptic prophet who anticipated God would soon intervene in the course of history to overthrow the forces of evil and establish his good kingdom on Earth, and that people needed to repent in preparation for it.
  • The Gospels are our principal sources for knowing about the life and teachings of Jesus, but they are also major literary works in their own right, each with its own perspective on who Jesus was and why his life and death matter.
  • Jesus is portrayed individually in all the Gospels, including two Gospels that did not make it into the New Testament, the Gospels of Peter and Thomas.
  • Many people believe that the relationship between Paul and Jesus enabled Paul, through his writings, to transform the religion of Jesus into a religion about Jesus.
  • Modern scholars examining some New Testament books that claim Paul as their author have concluded that they are, in fact, pseudonymous.
  • Portions of the New Testament were included hundreds of years after the death of Christ.
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24 lectures
 |  30 minutes each
  • 1
    The Early Christians and Their Literature
    In our strictly historical study of the New Testament, our overarching questions will include: Who were the actual authors? To whom did they write? x
  • 2
    The Greco-Roman Context
    Why must anyone who hopes to interpret the New Testament understand its historical context? What was the religious environment of the Greco-Roman world like? How was ancient paganism different from what people today think of as religion? x
  • 3
    Ancient Judaism
    Judaism, into which Jesus was born, was like other religions of the Greco-Roman world in some respects, but very different in others. At the time of Jesus, it had several sects. Many Jews embraced apocalyptic ideas, maintaining that God would soon intervene in history, crushing evil and bringing about his kingdom on Earth. x
  • 4
    The Earliest Traditions About Jesus
    Even though the earliest traditions about Jesus go back to eyewitnesses, the Gospels were not written down for several decades. Why do scholars think that during this period, some traditions about Jesus came to be modified or even created? x
  • 5
    Mark—Jesus the Suffering Son of God
    Mark is the shortest and oldest of the four Gospels. Its unknown author had access to oral traditions about Jesus. Mark orders these traditions into a portrait of Jesus as the authoritative but almost universally misunderstood Messiah and Son of God, whose mission is to suffer and die for the sins of the world. x
  • 6
    Matthew—Jesus the Jewish Messiah
    Because Matthew, Mark, and Luke share so many of the same stories, they are often called the "Synoptic" Gospels. Their similarities are usually taken to mean that one, Mark, served as a source for the other two. One of the ways to study Matthew and Luke is to compare them to Mark, looking for evidence of modifications. Matthew in particular stresses Jesus' Jewish identity and his relationship to currents within the Judaism of his age. x
  • 7
    Luke—Jesus the Savior of the World
    Luke emphasizes Jesus as a Jewish prophet. Jesus knows that it is God's plan for his salvation to go out to the whole world, and hence does not predict the imminent end of the age. The message of salvation must first go out to the Gentiles, which will take time. Since the church will be in the world for a long haul, Luke puts a special stress on Jesus' "social" message of compassion for the poor and downtrodden. x
  • 8
    John—Jesus the Man from Heaven
    In John's strikingly singular account, Jesus' own identity is the core issue. Rather than simply being a misunderstood representative of God's will, or a rejected prophet, or a Jewish messiah sent from the Jewish God in fulfillment of the Jewish scriptures, John's Jesus is himself divine, equal with God, an incarnation of God's own Word through which he created the universe. x
  • 9
    Noncanonical Gospels
    More than 20 Gospels survive that did not make it into the New Testament. Most are highly legendary and use earlier written accounts as sources. They can be categorized as either narrative or "sayings" Gospels. In this lecture, you will examine examples of each, including one that is among the most exciting archaeological finds of modern times: the "Gnostic" Gospel of Thomas unearthed at Nag Hammadi, Egypt, in 1947. x
  • 10
    The Historical Jesus—Sources and Problems
    In this lecture, you move beyond a discussion of the early Christian Gospels as literary texts, each with a distinctive portrayal of Jesus, to consider their value as historical sources. How can sources that appear to contain discrepancies and that have their own theological agendas be used to achieve a historical reconstruction of the life of the man who stands behind them all? x
  • 11
    The Historical Jesus—Solutions and Methods
    What criteria do scholars use to determine which surviving traditions about Jesus preserve historically reliable information? This lecture explores these criteria at greater length, explaining the logic behind each and exploring several examples of how they can be applied. x
  • 12
    Jesus the Apocalyptic Prophet
    Why does careful research indicate that the historical Jesus is best understood as a 1st-century Jewish apocalpyticist? What are the beliefs that fit under the rubric "apocalypticist," and how do the words and deeds of Jesus reveal his relationship to them? x
  • 13
    The Acts of the Apostles
    Written by the evangelist Luke, Acts narrates the growth and spread of the church, starting from just after Jesus' ascension. In this lecture we will explore this narrative, examine the historical accuracy of some of its accounts, and discuss Luke's perspective. x
  • 14
    Paul—The Man, the Mission, and the Modus Operandi
    Apart from Jesus, the most important figure in early Christianity was the apostle Paul. For various reasons, a clear picture of his life and teachings is elusive. Yet a careful reading of his letters and the book of Acts reveals significant information about the life and work of this highly religious Pharisaic Jew who became a Christian missionary, intent on spreading the Gospel among the Gentiles. x
  • 15
    Paul and the Crises of His Churches—First Corinthians
    Why can we take Paul's first letter to the Christians at Corinth as representative of all his writings? What are the problems besetting this community of believers? What is the Apostle's impassioned response? x
  • 16
    Pauline Ethics
    Paul's writings are pervaded by a concern for upright, moral living. He believes that even the Gentiles should strive to follow the ethical laws of the Jewish Scriptures, especially the command of Leviticus 19:18 that one should love one's neighbor as oneself. Given Paul's teaching that salvation cannot be gained through observance of God's law, does his ethical concern represent a paradox? Finally, is there a link between Paul's apocalyptic convictions and his teachings on ethics? x
  • 17
    Paul’s Letter to the Romans
    What is unique about the letter to the Romans? What are the two different models of salvation through Christ that Paul propounds here? And what part does God's revealed law, given to the Jews and preserved by them in the Hebrew Bible, play in God's ultimate plan of redemption? x
  • 18
    Paul, Jesus, and James
    In previous lectures we have examined the teachings of the historical Jesus and the theological views of the apostle Paul. In this lecture we will compare what we have found, adding the views of the apostle James to gain a rounded sense of the diversity of early Christian beliefs. x
  • 19
    The Deutero-Pauline Epistles
    This lecture considers some of the Deutero-Pauline epistles, so called because scholars accord them a secondary place within the Pauline corpus. Writing in someone else's name was a well-known practice in the ancient world, and could be a good strategy for getting one's work read. In this lecture, most of our attention will focus on Ephesians, which speaks eloquently of the unity of Jew and Gentile in Christ, but which does not appear to have come from Paul's pen. x
  • 20
    The Pastoral Epistles
    What makes the letters 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, and Titus pastoral epistles? Why are scholars convinced that Paul himself could not have written them? x
  • 21
    The Book of Hebrews and the Rise of Christian Anti-Semitism
    Did you know that the so-called epistle to the Hebrews is neither an epistle nor addressed to the Hebrews? To whom is it addressed, then, and for what purpose? Why does it teach what it does about the superiority of Christianity to Judaism, and why did the early Christians include it in the canon? x
  • 22
    First Peter and the Persecution of the Early Christians
    This lecture briefly discusses 1 Peter and its teachings on suffering for the faith. Then it explores more broadly the issue of persecution in early Christianity. What was the status of Christianity under the Roman empire? Why were there outbreaks of persecution against Christians, and how systematic were the abuses inflicted on followers of Christ? x
  • 23
    The Book of Revelation
    The Revelation of John is probably the most fascinating book in the New Testament, and almost certainly the most widely misunderstood. This lecture explores apocalyptic writing as a symbol-rich literary form, and argues that this particular Christian apocalypse is best read within its own historical context of religious persecution under the Roman Empire. x
  • 24
    Do We Have the Original New Testament?
    No original manuscript of any book in the New Testament appears to have survived. There are thousands of handwritten copies in Greek, but most date from centuries after the originals, no two match completely, and all are filled with mistakes. x

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Your professor

Bart D. Ehrman

About Your Professor

Bart D. Ehrman, Ph.D., M.Div.
The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Dr. Bart D. Ehrman is the James A. Gray Distinguished Professor at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He completed his undergraduate work at Wheaton College and earned his M.Div. and Ph.D. from Princeton Theological Seminary. Professor Ehrman has written or edited 27 books, including four best sellers on The New York Times list: Misquoting Jesus: The Story behind Who Changed the Bible and Why; God’s...
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Reviews

New Testament is rated 3.9 out of 5 by 214.
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent course!! Professor Bart D Ehrman is an excellent teacher. My understanding of the Bible grown leaps and bounds. This is the fourth course that I have by him. If I see his name on any Course, I will buy it. Well done!!!
Date published: 2017-08-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I have seen another course from this professor and like him very much. I am about a third of the way through this one and recommend it highly. It is important for all Christians to understand how the Bible came about.
Date published: 2017-08-12
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Excellent Content and Approach I have really enjoyed this course. I'm a lifelong, devoted Christian--someone who believes that Jesus is the Son of God and the Redeemer of humankind. There was nothing threatening or upsetting at all about learning about the historical Jesus or the origins of the New Testament. The professor is very fair minded. This course has made the New Testament more interesting to me, and I am looking forward to reading it again to benefit from knowing the context and history better. I'm giving this four stars only because I wish it were even more detailed.
Date published: 2017-08-06
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Disappointed course did not run on Safari. As a user of Mac Computers, iPad and iPhone, I was disappointed that the course lessons did not run on Safari. I was further disappointed in the course or more specifically, the professor. A significant amount of lecture time was redundant to the previous lesson. Of greater irritant was his constant reminder that his material was being presented from a historical basis.
Date published: 2017-08-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from First-rate lectures The lecturer was superior in his presentation of the material: putting the NT in historical context so that one might understand it as contemporaries did.
Date published: 2017-06-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from New Testament Profesor Bart D. Herman Ph D. does an extraordinary job by explaining the "historic context" of the most known about and less understood books ever written. Effortlessly he pokes the curiosity of the minds making you hungry for more knowledge after each lesson. The lessons are concise, but reach of information. I am very happy with the "course". Again,...outstanding job profesor. Thank you! RDM
Date published: 2017-05-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Well Researched and Insightful First, this lecture is probably not for religious people hoping to find an historical basis for their belief in the new testament events. Professor Ehrman provides an in depth look at the new testament, with a generally religious neutral analysis, its historical accuracy and the potential influences on, and motivations of, it authors. This lecture is a great update/supplement to his lecture series on the making of the new testament. For a lecture series on the creation of the new testament from a religious neutral perspective, I do not know of any lecturer who provides a more thorough, compelling, and insightful perspective of this fascinating book.
Date published: 2017-05-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Interesting and Informative I liked this course. I bought it after listening to a streamed lecture the Professor gave on the history of biblical interpretation (textualism, translations, etc.). I listened to the lectures on my commute and didn't read the materials -- nevertheless I learned a lot. I didn't know much about early Christianity (I never studied Religion or History) and I feel that this course gave me a better context for reading scripture. The professor goes out of his way to stress that he is not giving a theological lesson and to distinguish between studying christianity from a historical vs. a theological lens. I bought additional courses from this professor after taking this course. What I got out of the course was a deeper understanding of the way the New Testament was put together, the context of the Gospels -- and why they might have focused on certain things (for example, the destruction of the Temple, why Bethlehem would have been important, who Paul's audience was and what was the purpose behind his letters). I am a Christian and really liked the course - I didn't find it to be offensive to my faith. But I think if you believe in the literal word of the Bible, this course may not be right for you. If you have previously studied the topic, the course may be too superficial.
Date published: 2017-04-14
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