The Learning Brain

Course No. 1569
Professor Thad A. Polk, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
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4.6 out of 5
38 Reviews
86% of reviewers would recommend this product
Course No. 1569
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What Will You Learn?

  • Discover the "SCoRe" learning process.
  • Unearth the most effective study habits.
  • Master the four factors of motivation.

Course Overview

One of the most complicated and advanced computers on Earth can’t be purchased in any store. This astonishing device, responsible for storing and retrieving vast quantities of information that can be accessed at a moment’s notice, is the human brain. How does such a dynamic and powerful machine make memories, learn a language, and remember how to drive a car? What habits can we adopt to learn more effectively throughout our lives? And how do factors like traumatic injuries, stress, and mood affect our grey matter? The answers to these questions are merely the tip of the iceberg in The Learning Brain.

These 24 half-hour lectures offer in-depth and surprising lessons on how the brain learns and remembers. You begin your journey by focusing on which parts of the brain are responsible for different kinds of memory, from long-term memory for personal experiences and memorized facts to short-term memory, and how these memory systems work on a psychological and biological level. You’ll acquire a new understanding of how amnesia, aging, and sleep affect your brain. You’ll also discover better ways to absorb and retain all kinds of information in all stages of life. This course is chock full of valuable information whether you’re learning a new language at 60 or discovering calculus at 16. If you need better study habits, struggle with learning a new skill, or just worry about memories fading with age, The Learning Brainprovides illuminating insights and advice.

Map Your Brain’s Memory Areas

You’ll discover that the brain acquires, retains, and recalls information in several distinct ways.

  • Explicit Learning refers to learning information that is consciously available and can be put into words. One example is “semantic memory,” which involves impersonal fact-based memories, such as the distance from the Earth to the sun or the capitals of different nations.
  • Implicit Learning, by contrast, is learning that is unconscious and harder to put into words. One particularly important type of implicit learning is “procedural learning,” which is the learning of new skills such as playing the piano or playing golf.

As you learn new information and skills, you also put your working memory to use. Working memory is the cognitive system we use to hold on to information for just a few seconds or minutes at a time. For example, adding two two-digit numbers in your head or remembering the next step of a recipe while preparing a meal both utilize working memory.

While distinguishing the different learning systems that we use every day, Professor Polk also explains which regions of the brain underlie these various functions. Scientists use modern technology like fMRI and PET scans to see which parts of the brain are activated during different types of learning. By mapping out the brain in this way, doctors can isolate and treat brain damage, specific learning disabilities, and behavioral anomalies better than ever before.

Tackle Sensitive Psychological Issues

Specific learning disabilities are also common in children around the globe, and they can be detrimental as well as disheartening. Professor Polk covers a number of both common and lesser-known roadblocks to learning that result from these impairments. While primarily focusing on dyslexia, Professor Polk discusses how learning disabilities affect children in school and how such disabilities are manifested in the brain.

Can learning sometimes be more harmful than helpful? The answer is yes. While Professor Polk delves more deeply into bad habits with his previous course, The Addictive Brain, here he briefly covers the effects of addictive substances on your brain and how drugs of abuse can hijack the very mechanisms that allow us to learn so effectively. Specifically, all addictive drugs lead to the release of abnormal amounts of the neurotransmitter dopamine, which fools the brain into reinforcing drug-taking behavior, even though it’s harmful. With repeated drug use, this reinforcement can lead to irresistible cravings and to the downward spiral of harmful behavior associated with addiction.

Professor Polk presents the latest scientific evidence on these conditions. You’ll find a cornucopia of valuable information to better educate yourself, whether you or a loved one struggles with a learning-related problem, or whether you’re simply seeking to better understand how the brain works.

Learn to Learn

Haven’t we all stayed up until dawn cramming for a test, at some point in our life? Or, haven’t we all read and re-read the same paragraph in a book or in a speech we have to give, assuming we’ve memorized it, only to fail to remember it the next day? As it turns out, there are several popular studying habits and learning methods that range from helpful to harmful, and Professor Polk untangles this web in several lectures throughout the course.

  • Learn how to “SCoRe.” That is to say, Space out your practice, Challenge yourself at just the right level of difficulty, and Randomize your studies.
  • Master the four factors of motivation. Discover “self-efficacy,” or your confidence in your ability to learn; “perceived control,” which is the extent you believe you control how much you learn about a subject; “intrinsic motivation,” defined as wanting to learn something; and finally “value,” or how much you believe that what you’re learning truly matters.
  • Unearth the most-effective study habits. From highlighting and underlining key phrases in books to using flash cards, from staying focused on one subject to testing yourself, not all study techniques are created equal. Find out which ones work best—and worst.

Neuroscience, Not Brain Surgery

Even with no prior experience in psychology, by taking this course you’ll soon have a working knowledge of how we make and retrieve memories, learn new skills, and get better results from studying, all from the vantage point of psychology, neuroscience, and biology. With a renowned psychology professor as your guide, The Learning Brainoffers facts, techniques, and practical knowledge with real-world applications. Whether you are a student in school, a student of life, or just curious about how your own mind works, this course not only improves your understanding of learning, but it also can help you become a better learner yourself.

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24 lectures
 |  Average 31 minutes each
  • 1
    Learning 101
    Beginning with a clear, working definition of the concept of “learning,” Professor Polk eases you into a course overview with simple examples of some of the topics that will be covered, including how scientists study learning, the neural basis of learning, and effective learning strategies. x
  • 2
    What Amnesia Teaches Us about Learning
    In the 1950s, a Connecticut man named Henry Molaison became an unfortunate but invaluable source of information about how learning is implemented in the human brain after an experimental brain surgery led to profound amnesia. Studies of how he could (and couldn’t) learn—and what those studies uncover about how the rest of us learn—are detailed in this revealing lecture. x
  • 3
    Conscious, Explicit Learning
    In this lecture, we discover that we can remember visual information better than verbal information, and that we remember vivid images better than ordinary ones. We also discover that how much you already know about a topic can have a profound influence on how easy it is to learn new information about it. These examples demonstrate conscious “explicit learning.” You may even learn how to memorize your grocery list better. x
  • 4
    Episodic Memory and Eyewitness Testimony
    Any fan of courtroom drama has seen the powerful influence that the testimony of an eyewitness can have on legal proceedings. But how reliable is our memory for events that we personally witness? In this lecture, we learn that much of what we remember is often a plausible reconstruction of what might have happened, rather than an accurate memory of what actually happened. We also discover just how susceptible eyewitness memories are to distortion, and how being asked seemingly innocuous questions can lead to substantial errors in our memory. Married couples, enter at your own risk. x
  • 5
    Semantic Memory
    How do you know the distance to the Earth from the Sun? With no first-hand experience, we use “semantic memory”—impersonal, fact-based memory—for world knowledge. Semantic memory also includes our grouping or categorizing of information—but how do our brains do that? Professor Polk makes short, easy work of the subject. x
  • 6
    The Neural Basis of Explicit Learning
    Take a fantastic voyage into your brain to uncover the physical mechanisms involved in forming explicit memories. The voyage begins in the hippocampus, the seahorse-shaped structure in each temporal lobe, where explicit learning begins. It continues out to the cerebral cortex—the grey matter on the outside of the brain—where memories eventually become consolidated and integrated with other memories. x
  • 7
    Strategies for Effective Explicit Learning
    Set your highlighters and pens down and stop re-reading your material! These are actually two of the least-effective study techniques. Professor Polk explains why these old techniques don't really work and offers four different, and more efficient, approaches to studying, which have been scientifically demonstrated to work more effectively. x
  • 8
    Controversies in Explicit Learning Research
    To wrap up the course’s section on conscious, explicit learning, Professor Polk delivers an enticing “myth-busting” talk about controversial topics in the field. Do different students have different learning styles and, if so, should we tailor our teaching methods to match the learning styles of individual students? Can playing Mozart increase your baby’s intelligence? Do people repress traumatic memories and can such repressed memories later re-emerge? Professor Polk cuts through the hype and lays out the actual scientific findings related to each of these controversies. x
  • 9
    Unconscious, Implicit Learning
    In this lecture, The Learning Brain switches gears from explicit to implicit learning, that is, learning that is unconscious and hard to verbalize. Discover non-associative learning, like learning to ignore a fan blowing in a room, as well as associative learning, such as conditioning, through which positive and negative reinforcement can shape behaviors over time. x
  • 10
    The Psychology of Skill Learning
    Compare the first time you tried to tie your shoes to your present-day, shoelace-tying mastery. How did you come such a long way? Practice alone doesn't begin to cover the intricate process of your brain learning a skill. See which stages are involved in acquiring skill-based knowledge and how you put them all together, with this insightful discussion. x
  • 11
    Language Acquisition
    Learning a new language is labor-intensive and complicated, so how do toddlers do it so easily? This lecture details how our brains progress from single-word associations to forming full, original sentences, as well as how babies learn to overcome obstacles like learning irregular past-tense verb forms (look/looked versus run/ran, for example). x
  • 12
    The Neural Basis of Implicit Learning
    Turn again to the neural components of learning to better understand how unconscious, implicit learning occurs in your brain. You actually have more connections between the neurons in your brain than there are stars in our galaxy, and learning involves strengthening and weakening these connections in very specific ways. Explore how your brain does so, how it learns to predict rewards, and the role that dopamine plays in the learning process. x
  • 13
    Strategies for Effective Skill Learning
    Beginning the second half of this course, we return to more practical applications of learning science. Care to step up your tennis, golf, or typing game? This series of sometimes counterintuitive, yet wildly effective, tips and tricks will surprise you. As always, proven studies and examples abound. x
  • 14
    Learning Bad Habits: Addiction
    How can learning go wrong? Using the knowledge you've been taught so far, you can unmask the dark side of unconscious associations and reward-seeking behavior: addictions to drugs and alcohol. Professor Polk delves into the psychological, chemical, and neural mechanisms underlying addiction to help understand this serious and delicate subject. x
  • 15
    Introduction to Working Memory
    Begin with an overview of working (or short-term) memory, which is vital to rational thought. This lecture introduces you to the idea of working memory and discusses one of the most important mechanisms involved, the “phonological loop,” which we use to store language sounds like words for brief periods of time. x
  • 16
    Components of Working Memory
    Several important components of working memory are covered here: the visuospatial sketchpad, which retains images from both recent perception and from long-term memory; the central executive, which decides which cognitive functions to perform and when to perform them; and the episodic buffer, which links information from other working memory components into integrated wholes. x
  • 17
    The Neural Basis of Working Memory
    Diving back into the brain itself, this lecture explores the neuroscience behind working memory in much the same way earlier lectures examined explicit memory and implicit memory. Are different parts of the brain responsible for storing visual information versus verbal information in working memory? Prepare for an illuminating ride. x
  • 18
    Training Your Working Memory
    Psychological elements of working memory? Check. Neurological elements? Check. Next, we learn about the controversial topic of improving your working memory. Some scientists believe that training your working memory can improve your overall intelligence and reduce ADHD symptoms; others disagree. Both sides of these widely debated controversies are discussed. x
  • 19
    How Motivation Affects Learning
    Enjoy this eye-opening discussion about our drive—or lack thereof— to learn, and the enormous impact our motivation can have. Our personal interest in a subject, our belief in our own ability to learn it, and several other factors profoundly impact what we retain about that subject. Improve your learning ability today with this practical lecture. x
  • 20
    How Stress and Emotion Affect Learning
    Ask almost anyone where they were when they heard about major events like the 9/11 attacks or the Challenger explosion and they remember immediately. Why, psychologically, do those memories remain so vivid? And do short, quick moments of stress versus chronic stress affect our memories differently? How? These answers and more await you. x
  • 21
    How Sleep Affects Learning
    If you think “getting a good night’s rest” is the only way that sleep affects learning, think again. Our brain is often just as active during sleep as it is while we’re awake, and what happens at a neural level during sleep has a profound impact on what we remember, and what we forget. Furthermore, different stages of sleep influence different kinds of learning and memory, and that’s just the beginning. x
  • 22
    How Aging Affects Learning
    Here’s another fascinating surprise: Aging does not inevitably lead to learning and memory problems. In fact, there are substantial differences in how aging affects different cognitive functions and in how it affects different people. Fortunately, Professor Polk demonstrates several proven—and enjoyable—methods of maintaining and even improving our brains as we get older. x
  • 23
    Dyslexia and Other Learning Disabilities
    In this, the fifth and final lecture on factors that influence learning and memory, several common learning disabilities are defined and explored. Learn about dyslexia, the most common learning disability, including its symptoms, the neural mechanisms that underlie it, and how difficulty in recognizing and manipulating phonemes—the set of basic sounds that get combined to form words—plays a large role. x
  • 24
    Optimizing Your Learning
    Professor Polk wraps things up by discussing five strategies that can make you a better learner. These strategies draw on and integrate some of the key themes that have appeared throughout the rest of this Great Course. And, putting them into practice in your own life can help you to become the best learner you can be. x

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What Does Each Format Include?

Video DVD
Instant Video Includes:
  • Download 24 video lectures to your computer or mobile app
  • Downloadable PDF of the course guidebook
  • FREE video streaming of the course from our website and mobile apps
Video DVD
DVD Includes:
  • 24 lectures on 4 DVDs
  • 264-page printed course guidebook
  • Downloadable PDF of the course guidebook
  • FREE video streaming of the course from our website and mobile apps
  • Closed captioning available

What Does The Course Guidebook Include?

Video DVD
Course Guidebook Details:
  • 264-page printed course guidebook
  • Photos and illustrations
  • Suggested reading
  • Questions to consider

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Your professor

Thad A. Polk

About Your Professor

Thad A. Polk, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
Professor Thad A. Polk is an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor in the Department of Psychology and the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan. He received a B.A. in Mathematics from the University of Virginia and an interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Computer Science and Psychology from Carnegie Mellon University. He also received postdoctoral training in cognitive neuroscience at the...
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Reviews

The Learning Brain is rated 4.6 out of 5 by 38.
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Science...Useful Suggestions This is a very clearly and well presented set of lectures...coming from the very engaging Thad Polk. The audio version works for me for a variety of reasons (you audiophiles out there understand), but maybe the video versions might be a little better. Having said that, the guidebook is quite good. If you follow the lectures with the guidebook, you may come out ahead...but it takes work! The lectures are structured around a basic pattern in which a brief history (studies by institutions or individuals) is followed by brain physiology (what parts of the brain is involved) and then, often, meaningful suggestions as to how an individual might incorporate those suggestions into improving certain aspects of their life. Sometimes a quick quiz is offered to elucidate the focus of the topic (e.g. short- vs long- term memory.) All the lectures seem to flow easily into one another, with the final lecture, #24, acting as a summation of the course, emphasizing some of the more salient points and suggestions. The guidebook, again, is very, very good! All in all this is a great course, worthy of your attention and your hard earned money, though even an aging brain can figure out that getting this one on sale, with a coupon, is an easily learned lesson. (I listened to these lectures during a particularly stressful time in my life. I plan on revisiting the course in the future and will update my review at that time).
Date published: 2019-03-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great course! Very interesting, and information is all updated or new research.
Date published: 2019-01-07
Rated 2 out of 5 by from I am more than a little disappointed that the 8 courses that I just purchased cannot play with closed captions as I have a hearing disability and do not read lips. I spoke with a representative when purchasing them and they did not mention this. I feel cheated that I have to buy the DVD in order to get that feature. Why sell the online version at all if it's not accessible to everyone. Therefore I can't really rate the actual course. I have bought many great courses on DVD but I find them obsolete as my iMac doesn't have a drive. I don't think of closed caption as an "extra" but rather a necessity. I hope they will refund me.
Date published: 2019-01-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Best investment ever! Can't wait to finish The Learning Brain, it is just that right now I am loving Mastering the Fundamentals of Math.
Date published: 2018-12-31
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Video streaming was too expensive. I tried to get more of a discount, however the customer services rep refused my offer.
Date published: 2018-12-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Satisfied Content I wanted to broaden my interest in the brain. This course is a perfect selection to enable me to get the most in-depth information.
Date published: 2018-12-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Learning Brain is Great Learning I have found all the courses by Thad Polk to be among the very best ones I have. I can heartily recommend any of his courses, and The Learning Brain is yet another great journey through the workings of the what is still the most mysterious organ.
Date published: 2018-10-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Interesting sights Professor Polk does a terrific job in presenting this series of lectures. He accomplished the task of maintaining interest throughout the course on topics that can sometimes be rather dull. Does a great job of introducing the basic fundamentals of learning processes of the brain, and the factors impacting the learning process. Recommend this course highy to gain a fundamental knowledge of the learning processes of our bain.
Date published: 2018-10-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Learning Brain As a former educator I wish I had listened to this course when I was teaching and supervising teachers. I feel that every educator should take this course and then apply it to their teaching and their students.
Date published: 2018-10-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from This was a fascinating course. I was really interested in how you can study better. I enjoyed the course. It was awesome.
Date published: 2018-10-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Awesome course! This is a very interesting topic that was new to me. I was thoroughly engaged throughout the entire course, and learned quite a bit. The professor provides coverage of a wide range of areas in memory and learning, and presents it in a manor that is very easy to follow. The course has encouraged me to dig deeper in this area. And because I like the professor’s style, I already have purchased another course from him. I sure wish I knew some (all) of this while I was in college, it would have made my life much easier! I think it might also help me figure out a way to teach my mother, once and for all, how to use the computer. I think she falls the camp of feeling like she can’t learn this “new” technology and gets blocked. I think I might just get her this course for Christmas. Even if it doesn’t help, she was a teacher so it should be interesting to her. The level of detail is just about right for an audio class. I listened to it at the gym, and had no issues with keeping up with the pace. While he does refer to areas of the brain, he did not get too deep into the neurological details, so I do not think it is necessary to take the video version unless you prefer that type of teaching.
Date published: 2018-09-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Scientifically based guide to learning Just purchased this course and am half way through the lectures. So far I am very impressed with the clarity and science based information being presented. Dr Polk is a very good presenter and has, with assistance of his staff, put together a top notch course that is teaching me what I should have had early in life--how to learn using a researched based system. This would be a great course for all Great Courses subscribers and one that should be mandatory for all college freshmen!
Date published: 2018-08-31
Rated 5 out of 5 by from interesting material presented in an engaging way The course starts with a discussion on various types on learning, and then gives concrete examples on how to improve learning. It's both a theoretical and practical course. Just enough biology to put things into context.
Date published: 2018-08-27
Rated 1 out of 5 by from not my best purchase I was not pleased with the course content or its presentation. I have heard similar courses before. this one did not click
Date published: 2018-08-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I love all the great courses. I have many and enjoy all of them
Date published: 2018-08-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I highly recommend this course! The material was great, the professor, Thad Polk, was even better. He hit a home run for me with this course. It answered a lot of questions, and it opened up my eyes to more effective learning. He kept me engrossed the entire time with his knowledge as well as his highly effective way of explaining the material. I would take a class from him no matter what the subject because I feel with his knowledge and public speaking skills I could learn whatever subject he was teaching. I now have more understanding of the various parts of our brain and how the process of learning happens from when you first gain the material to when your brain puts it away for permanent storage. From how that all happens I know also understand more why I can't remember the few minutes leading up to an accident I had years ago when I was knocked unconscious, so the recent memory never was stored. Much like what is in RAM on your computer and what happens to that if you don't save it before turning the power off. I only wish I had know some of this material years ago, but even at 71 years old it will help me in my ongoing learning.
Date published: 2018-07-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Solid Insights into the Learning Brain!! The Learning Brain Course taught by Professor Thad A. Polk provides key insights into the processes our brain uses to capture and interpret sensory inputs and learning. Both the Professor and the information provided are captivating. Professor Polk is a pleasure to have guide the learner through the processes used by the Learning Brain. As a elderly male adult I found the course to more than expected, and I could not stop watching. Professor Polk is smooth, eloquent, and brilliant in his delivery. I highly recommend this course and look forward to other Dr. Polk courses. Every lecture is packed with usable knowledge about the structure of the brain and how it does its work for us. The final lecture Professor Polk does a thorough job of summarizing the wealth of data and knowledge he presented. If you believe in the maxim, 'Know Thy Self', as I do, this course greatly help with that!! Outstanding course and Outstanding Professor!!!!
Date published: 2018-07-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Worthy of being a Great Course The professor speaks clearly other than one area and it is his pronunciation of some contractions. For example: “didn’t” becomes “dint.” Probably a colloquialism from where he grew up. This is a mere speck of star dust in a stellar course and I give the course a full five stars.
Date published: 2018-07-14
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Interesting for beginners Professor Polk presents the material in a clear and concise manner. He is a polished performer and most entertaining. As another reviewer mentioned the off-putting background set. It is highly distractive as it tends to draw attention of the learner away from the presenter. Not an ideal learning setting. The lectures are well presented but rather shallow in places. Important points of learning were only given lip-service or overlooked completely. I found this rather disappointing. Many times the presenter refered to small psychology experiments done with students in universities, while the work of a some ground breaking research findings in cognitive neuroscience and learning (both explicit and implicit) were not mentioned. The study techniques discussed could also have been more fully explained from the brain science viewpoint. I did like the highlighting of the various brain myths and learning. That section was well done. Overall I would suggest the course as a good starting point for those wishing to improve their learning performance by better understanding how the brain learns.
Date published: 2018-06-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Lots of information on many levels-really good I have been averaging about a lesson a day, first thing in the morning. I have enjoyed that time with this professor and his style. I am more aware of my "working memory" and am glad to challenge it!
Date published: 2018-06-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great information! As a long time educator, I've been interested in how adults learn and how we can improve our cognitive skills as we age. This course provided useful information on this topic. Professor Polk's presentation was informative and interesting and provided the neural foundation for learning.
Date published: 2018-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of the best lecturers. The course is presented in an engaging way, with helpful graffics and clear explanations. It is aimed at giving useful information to life long learners in the quest to get more out of courses. Good review of types of memory and how they differ.
Date published: 2018-06-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Another fascinating course by Prof. Polk This is the third course I have taken by Professor Polk, the others being “the aging brain” and “the addictive brain”. I found both to be absolutely first rate and to provide a comprehensive survey of the subject. In this course too, Professor Polk spends most of his time discussing current understandings of the field. This is done primarily through surveys and analyses of important experiments. He spends a significant amount of time explaining the controversies and the doubts regarding many of the findings, and this is very helpful for creating a mental picture of how much can be considered “solid ground” and what is likely to still be challenged in the future. One aspect I found particularly well done and fascinating, is how addiction “highjacks” the brain’s natural mechanisms for learning. He dedicated a significant amount of time to demonstrate this in his course “The addictive brain”, but in the context of learning this became much clearer. The lectures about working memory were also extremely interesting, and gave me a good understanding of why working memory is so highly correlated with intelligence As he mentions in this course, his wife always tells him that he is one of the best lecturers in TGC – as long as he agrees to do the dishes. I happen to agree (regardless of the dishes)… another very fine and fascinating course, and easily worth the time and effort.
Date published: 2018-06-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Exactly as described in the catalog The moderator, Thad Polk, is a very pleasant and informative speaker. He is knowledgeable, articulate, and interesting as he delivers the many lectures. Very glad I purchased this course and highly recommended it for those interested in brain related subject matter.
Date published: 2018-06-17
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great Presenter and Material, limping production I'm delighted with the material (as expected) and the presenter. However I did not like the production values. The presenter stands continually in a lobby. Only the camera angles change. Moreover the futuristic lobb, the (set or luxurious university?) is dramatic and distracting. In another vein, through many lessons, the sound is out of synch -- not greatly so, but annoying. On balance the good outweighs the bad and I would recommend the course.
Date published: 2018-06-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Enjoyed this course This teacher is likeable. By that I mean you would like to have lunch with him or go to a ballgame with him. This is rare, and not required but it is nice to see. He said only one “you know” in the entire course. He gave good tips for learning and covered the science very well. I would recommend this corse.
Date published: 2018-06-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Another home run by Professor Polk... If you have already had the pleasure of viewing or listening to Professor Polk's other courses ('the Aging Brain' and 'the Addictive Brain'), you will surely agree that his teaching style is as captivating as it is educational. Now, does the present course ('the Learning Brain') offer any new content to the Great Courses catalog outside of Professor Polk's other two courses and Professor Joordens's course ('Memory and the Human Lifespan')? The answer is most assuredly yes, but... Professor Polk's present course does have considerable crossover with Professor Joordens's course on memory; however, 'the Learning Brain' more of a basic science course than Professor Joordens's. In fact, I lost count of the number of famous learning and memory studies that Professor Polk cited, but it was almost certainly in the ~40-50 range. This was very helpful as it helped to establish both the history of the field and the primary effects/foundational evidence upon which the modern edifice of learning and memory research rests. Will this course improve your working memory and increase your fluid intelligence? Probably not, but that's because - as Professor Polk points out - attempts to increase these capacities tend to be oversold and unreliable. Your crystallized intelligence and semantic memory will benefit! Professor Polk does, however, provide several evidence-based tips to maximize your study efficiency and retention, including the SCR method (Space out your practice, Challenge yourself at just the right level of difficulty, and Randomize your studies). This section of this course is especially applicable for any students out there who still have to contend with tests. Professor Polk also underscores the importance of motivation to learning. We learn more effectively and retain information better when we believe that we can actually learn a subject (i.e. we are intrinsically bad at it). Don't tell yourself that you are terrible at calculus (self-fulfilling prophecy); instead, accept that you have probably forgotten or never properly learned the foundational knowledge (e.g. algebra). If you come to understand that 'you' aren't always the problem, learning tough subjects becomes far more enjoyable and efficient. Overall, even if you have taken Polk's 'the Aging Brain', 'the Addictive Brain', and Joordens's 'Memory and the Human Lifespan', I will still recommend 'the Learning Brain'. This course is a lot of fun while simultaneously being information-dense and applicable to everyday life. That's a hard act to follow...5/5.
Date published: 2018-06-02
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