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  • Radio Astronomy: Observing the Invisible Universe

    Professor Felix J. Lockman, Ph.D.

    Available Formats: Video Download, DVD

    Radio Astronomy: Observing the Invisible Universe takes you on a thrilling journey through astounding discoveries with Felix J. Lockman, Ph.D. You’ll learn that the dominant molecular structures in interstellar space are all based on carbon, just like Earth. It is likely that any extraterrestrial galactic life would be related to us at least on the molecular level. Will we find other organic lifeforms out there? Radio astronomers don’t know. But they’re certainly working on it.

    View Lecture List (24)
    24 Lectures  |  Radio Astronomy: Observing the Invisible Universe
    Lecture Titles (24)
    • 1
      Radio Astronomy and the Invisible Universe
      Even on the clearest, darkest night you cannot see more than five percent of the light from our home galaxy, the Milky Way, because of the blockage of light by dust. Fortunately, the 20th century brought us radio astronomy, the study of radio waves that travel through the dust, opening our eyes" to a universe we had never imagined." x
    • 2
      Thermal Radio Emission: The Planets
      Take a tour of our neighboring planets via their radio emissions and learn how scientists infer their temperatures and energy sources. You'll be shocked by the difference between their images in reflected sunlight-the images we're familiar with-and their appearance when we "see" the radio energy they emit on their own. x
    • 3
      The Birth of Radio Astronomy
      When young engineer Karl Jansky was tasked to find natural radio sources that could interfere with commercial transatlantic radio communications, radio astronomy was born. His work, and that of backyard astronomer Grote Reber, led to the discovery of synchrotron radiation. But it would be decades before scientists understood what these earliest radio astronomers had detected-cosmic rays and magnetic fields. x
    • 4
      The Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen
      Not long after the birth of radio astronomy, a Dutch student used what was then known about the physics of atoms to determine that if hydrogen existed in interstellar space, it would produce a specific spectral line at radio wavelengths. In 1951, the line was detected at 21 cm, exactly as predicted. At that moment, our understanding of the universe forever changed. x
    • 5
      Radio Telescopes and How They Work
      Radio telescopes are so large because radio waves contain such a small amount of energy. For example, the signal from a standard cell phone measured one kilometer away is five million billion times stronger than the radio signals received from a bright quasar. Learn how each of these fascinating instruments is designed to meet a specific scientific goal-accounting for their wide variation in form and size. x
    • 6
      Mapping the Hydrogen Sky
      Before there were stars and planets, before there were galaxies, there was hydrogen-and we still have more hydrogen today than any other element. Understanding the quantum physics of this simplest atomic structure, and using the Doppler shift and models of differential rotation in the Milky Way, astronomers have made myriad astounding discoveries about the universe. It all starts with hydrogen. x
    • 7
      Tour of the Green Bank Observatory
      The Green Bank Observatory is located within the 13,000-acre National Radio Quiet Zone straddling the border of Virginia and West Virginia. Come tour this fascinating facility where astronomers discovered radiation belts around Jupiter, the black hole at the center of our galaxy, and the first known interstellar organic molecule, and began the search for extra-terrestrial life. x
    • 8
      Tour of the Green Bank Telescope
      At 17 million pounds, and with more than 2,000 surface panels that can be repositioned in real time, this telescope is one of the largest moveable, land-based objects ever built. The dish could contain two side-by-side football fields, but when its panels are brought into focus, the surface has errors no larger than the thickness of a business card. Welcome to this rare insider's view. x
    • 9
      Hydrogen and the Structure of Galaxies
      Using the laws of physics and electromagnetic radiation, astronomers can weigh" a galaxy by studying the distribution of its rotating hydrogen. But when they do this, it soon becomes clear something is very wrong: A huge proportion of the galaxy's mass has simply gone missing. Welcome to the topsy-turvy world of dark matter-which we now believe accounts for a whopping 90 percent of our own Milky Way." x
    • 10
      Pulsars: Clocks in Space
      In the mid-1960s, astronomers discovered signals with predictable periodicity but no known source. In case these signals indicated extraterrestrial life, they were initially labeled LGM, Little Green Men. But research revealed the source of the pulsing radiation to be neutron stars. Learn how a star with a diameter of only a few kilometers and a mass similar to that of our Sun can spin around hundreds of times per second. x
    • 11
      Pulsars and Gravity
      A pulsar's spin begins with its birth in a supernova and can be altered by transfer of mass from a companion star. Learn how pulsars, these precise interstellar clocks, are used to confirm Einstein's prediction of gravitational waves by observations of a double-neutron-star system, and how we pull the pulsar signal out of the noise. x
    • 12
      Pulsars and the 300-Foot Telescope
      Humans constantly use radio transmission these days, for everything from military communications to garage-door openers. How can scientists determine which signals come from Earth and which come from space? Learn how the 300-foot telescope, located in two radio quiet zones, was built quickly and cheaply. It ended up studying pulsars and hydrogen in distant galaxies, and made the case for dark matter. x
    • 13
      The Big Bang: The Oldest Radio Waves
      Learn about techniques to separate signals originating in receivers from signals originating from outer space. Using a unique antenna located in New Jersey, we'll see how two radio astronomers with curiosity, persistence, and some manual labor, detected the faint radio signals from the big bang, the oldest electromagnetic radiation that can be detected. It tells us of conditions when the universe was young. x
    • 14
      H II Regions and the Birth of Stars
      Have you ever looked up to Orion on a dark winter's night and noticed a fuzzy patch near the center of the constellation? You're looking at the Orion nebula, a nursery" where stars are born every year. Learn why ionization occurs in these H II regions and how this hot plasma produces some of the most beautiful objects in the sky." x
    • 15
      Supernovas and the Death of Stars
      Chances are you would agree with astronomers that gravity is the single most important force or event shaping the world as you know it. But the second most important? That would be supernovas, and nothing you know would be here without them. Learn how super-massive stars can explode at the end of their lives, releasing energy that outshines 10 billion Suns. x
    • 16
      Radio Stars and Early Interferometers
      When radio astronomers discovered a sky full of small radio sources of unknown origin, they built telescopes using multiple antennas to try to understand them. Learn how and why interferometers were developed and how they have helped astronomers study quasars-those massively bright, star-like objects that scientists now know only occur in galaxies whose gas is falling into a supermassive black hole. x
    • 17
      Radio Source Counts
      Radio source counts have led to great discoveries about the universe, even though each individual radio source isn't fully understood. Between massive black holes and starbursts, scientists relying in part on astronomical surveys now believe galaxies can have different evolutionary tracks and histories. And the universe itself? It seems to be not only evolving, but evolving through stages. x
    • 18
      Active Galactic Nuclei and the VLA
      The need for a new generation of radio interferometers to untangle extragalactic radio sources led to the development of the Very Large Array (VLA) in New Mexico. With its twenty-seven radio antennas in a Y-shaped configuration, it gives both high sensitivity and high angular resolution. The VLA provided a deeper and clearer look at galaxies than ever before, and the results were astonishing. x
    • 19
      A Telescope as Big as the Earth
      Learn how astronomers use very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) with telescopes thousands of miles apart to essentially create a radio telescope as big as the Earth. With VLBI, scientists not only look deep into galactic centers, study cosmic radio sources, and weigh black holes, but also more accurately tell time, study plate tectonics, and more-right here on planet Earth. x
    • 20
      Galaxies and Their Gas
      In visible light, scientists had described galaxies as island universes." But since the advent of radio astronomy, we've seen galaxies connected by streams of neutral hydrogen, interacting with and ripping the gasses from each other. Now astronomers have come to understand that these strong environmental interactions are not a secondary feature-they are key to a galaxy's basic structure and appearance." x
    • 21
      Interstellar Molecular Clouds
      In the late 1960s, interstellar ammonia and water vapor were detected. Soon came formaldehyde, carbon monoxide, and the discovery of giant molecular clouds where we now know stars and planets are formed. With improvements in radio astronomy technology, today's scientists can watch the process of star formation in other systems. The initial results are stunning. x
    • 22
      Star Formation and ALMA
      With an array of 66 radio antennas located in the high Chilean desert above much of the earth's atmosphere, the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is a radio telescope tuned to the higher frequencies of radio waves. Designed to examine some of the most distant and ancient galaxies ever seen, ALMA has not only revealed new stars in the making, but planetary systems as well. x
    • 23
      Interstellar Chemistry and Life
      Interstellar clouds favor formation of carbon-based molecules over any other kind-not at all what statistical models predicted. In fact, interstellar clouds contain a profusion of chemicals similar to those that occur naturally on Earth. If planets are formed in this rich soup of organic molecules, is it possible life does not have to start from scratch on each planet? x
    • 24
      The Future of Radio Astronomy
      Learn about the newest radio telescopes and the exhilarating questions they plan to address: Did life begin in space? What is dark matter? And a new question that has just arisen in the past few years: What are fast radio bursts? No matter how powerful these new telescopes are, radio astronomers will continue pushing the limits to tell us more and more about the universe that is our home. x
  • Sewing 101: Skills, Fabrics, and Techniques

    Taught By Multiple Professors

    Available Formats: Video Download, DVD

    Unleash your creativity with the help of two highly skilled sewing instructors that take you from novice to advanced projects over the course of 40 lessons. With Sewing 101: Skills, Fabrics, and Techniques, you can gain the skills necessary to feel confident sewing any pattern—or creating your own.

    View Lecture List (40)
    40 Lectures  |  Sewing 101: Skills, Fabrics, and Techniques
    Lecture Titles (40)
    • 1
      Getting Started & Understanding Your Machine
      Gather your shopping list to be prepared: a sewing machine, needles, spools of thread, straight pins, measuring tools, fabric, removable fabric markers, and scissors. Walk through the parts of the sewing machine, including the "bag of parts" that you get with a new machine, and review some common troubleshooting scenarios if you're working with an older or unfamiliar machine. x
    • 2
      Needle & Thread, Fabric & Interfacing
      Explore the myriad types of thread available, as well as clever storage tips for your thread collection. Then, review the variety of needles you can use with your machine, from universal needles to specialty needles for stretchy fabrics, delicate fabrics, or thick fabrics. Finally, select and attach the type of interfacing that will provide optimal stability to your fabric. x
    • 3
      Cut like a Pro
      Identify the edges of your fabric—raw, folded, and selvage—and accurately place and pin your pattern pieces using the grain line. Compare the process of cutting out your pattern pieces with fabric scissors to using a rotary cutter, and why flat-head pins are the best choice for the latter. Finally, learn a trick to reviving a wrinkled old pattern instead of buying a new copy. x
    • 4
      How to Sew & Beginner Sewing Terminology
      This lesson walks you through selecting the correct presser foot, pinning your fabric pieces together, determining the correct seam allowance, and finally, letting your machine do the hard work for you. Sample swatches with clear contrast between fabric and thread allow you to see important concepts like backstitching, stitch lengths, and types of stitches. As you work, learn the vocabulary of sewing, from basting to bias cuts and more. x
    • 5
      Bring It All Together
      For your first project, create a beautiful notions storage pouch with three coordinating cotton fabrics and heavyweight interfacing. You will apply everything you have learned in the first five lessons and be amazed by the quality of your finished product. This pouch would make a great handmade gift for other crafters or for children to carry art supplies or small toys. x
    • 6
      Spotlight Project: Infinity Scarf
      If you want to learn how to work with stretchy knit fabrics (and if you enjoy accessorizing with pops of color) this lesson shows you how to create an infinity scarf. Learn about the needles, feet, stitches, and pinning techniques that are best for this stretchy fabric. Once you've seen how easy it is to create this versatile accessory, you'll want to make a dozen more! x
    • 7
      Skill Building: Making Your Own Bias Tape
      While you can buy pre-made bias tape at the fabric store, if you want to save money and achieve a more customized look, you can create your own using scraps of fabric you already have in your stash. Even a fat quarter is plenty of fabric to edge a baby bib, which is exactly what you'll be creating in this project guide. x
    • 8
      Designer Hints: Invisible Zippers
      Invisible zippers are perfect for skirts, dresses, and any garment where you need a zipper for functionality, but don't want it to be a design feature. Master the use of the concealed zipper foot and the delicate art of creating a zippered seam that is invisible and smooth. x
    • 9
      Spotlight Project: Boxy Pouch
      Continue working with zippers in the Boxy Pouch project. You'll learn how to create a 3D boxy bag with contrasting lining, a strap, and fabric zipper tabs. Conquer your fear of gussets with a foolproof method. These bags are indispensable for sewing notions, small knitting or crochet projects, art supplies, toiletries, LEGO blocks, or other small toys. x
    • 10
      Spotlight Project: Pajama Pants
      Nothing makes a lazy day feel even more luxurious than when you are wearing custom-designed pajama pants that you sewed yourself. It's the perfect project for fun, colorful fabrics. With this project, you'll learn how to create a channel to add an elastic waistband for the ultimate in lounging comfort. If you're looking for practice hemming before you hem your expensive pants, this project offers tips for you to get your feet wet with cuffs and hems. x
    • 11
      Spotlight Project: Reusable Tote
      Create a unique lunch tote lined with vinyl for easy cleaning. Get insider tips for sewing with vinyl, which is difficult to work with, resists pinning, and can stick to your sewing machine. Fold and sew a 6-inch gusset so your tote bag stands up on its own. You can then create the same pattern in larger sizes to use as a grocery bag or even a beach bag. x
    • 12
      Two-Handed Hot Pads
      In this lecture, create the first of an assortment of useful home goods: two-handed hot pads lined with heat-resistant batting that are perfect for moving trays and large pots. Understand why finishing your edges with bias tape is important when creating curved pieces and how to create and attach pockets that are the perfect size for your hands. x
    • 13
      Towel Toppers
      Sew a towel topper that not only keeps your dish towel close at hand, but makes your towel look like a delightful little dress. Discover the technique for creating a folded hem and neater seams on a steeply curved edge. Compare methods for attaching your towel topper to your oven handle. x
    • 14
      Reusable Bowl Cover
      Customize bowl covers for your favorite bowls using cotton fabric, elastic, and rickrack. These covers are handy for carrying a dish to a potluck, protecting picnic food from the elements, or just keeping that plate of cookies out of sight and out of mind. This project is a valuable first step in customizing a project to the size of an object, as opposed to from a pattern. x
    • 15
      Couch Caddy
      Keep your favorite book, reading glasses, and remote close by when you're relaxing in your living room with a couch caddy made from cotton fabric that coordinates with your existing decor. Learn how to create pleated pockets that make it easy to drop items in and take them out. You can make a weighted pocket for the other side or cut the project longer so the extra length can tuck under the seat cushion. x
    • 16
      Hanger Buddy & Plate Holder
      Make travel and camping easier when you make two simple projects: a zippered pouch that ties to a standard clothes hanger and can store accessories, jewelry, makeup, or other small objects, and a pouch that holds a plate, napkin, and silverware. Learn the "window technique" for hiding zipper tape under a decorative edge and how to best secure hook-and-loop tape. x
    • 17
      Outdoor Fabric & Cutting Perfect Squares
      Save money and create new cushions for your furniture. Explore the various fabrics that are good for indoor cushions, dog beds, throw pillows, or outdoor cushions. Calculate the amount of fabric you will need to buy to cover each cushion perfectly. Learn how to cut perfect right angles so your cushions look professional and neat. x
    • 18
      Setting a Zipper & Finishing
      Use your old cushion's measurements to determine where to put the zipper on your new cushion cover. Proper zipper placement ensures that your cover is easy to put on, is on a side that faces away from view, and any prints on your fabric are displayed right side up. You will also learn how to shorten a zipper that is too long for your cushion. x
    • 19
      Shaping the Cover
      Give your cushion cover dimension by adding gussets. Of course, since you have done your custom measurements, these gussets will give your cover a perfect fit to your existing cushion. Take your mastery of gussets one step further by learning how to create a gusset on an edge that has a zipper. Finally, cover your old cushions and enjoy! x
    • 20
      Getting Started & Expanding Your Stitches
      It may be tempting to stick to the default construction stitch for everything, but your machine can do so much more. Get a demonstration of stay stitching on a shirt pattern and see why you should never skip it. Then, learn how ease stitching makes it much easier to fit a sleeve into an arm hole. Finally, learn why topstitching is important and explore what color thread to use. x
    • 21
      Sewing Darts & Pleats
      Add dimension and texture to your projects with darts and pleats. Learn how to read a pattern to determine where darts and pleats should be placed. Review the process for creating knife pleats, box pleats, inverted box pleats, single pointed darts, double pointed darts, and curved darts and learn when to use them. x
    • 22
      Tips for Sewing Curves & Corners
      Smooth curves and sharp corners are the hallmark of an experienced sewer. While many issues can be avoided by adequate pinning and sewing slowly, there are others that require some specialized tricks that may not be listed in your patterns. Learn how to place a single stitch that will give you sharp corners with thicker fabric. x
    • 23
      Professional Seam Finishes & Ways to Hem
      Replicating the tailored seams and hems of a quality store-bought garment is easy to do with your home machine if you know these techniques. Using fabric swatches and contrasting colored thread, your instructor will walk you through creating a French seam, flat fell seam, double fold hem, and blind hems, as well as using hem tape. x
    • 24
      Selecting Shirt Size & Stitching Shirt Front
      In this first of six lessons, learn how to take measurements to create a garment that will fit the garment wearer's body perfectly. Begin your shirt sewing with the pocket and shirt front. Alter a rectangular pocket pattern to create a pointed bottom. Learn how to read your pattern so you attach your pocket at the perfect height on the shirt and pin straight. x
    • 25
      Adding a Yoke & Stitching Shirt Back
      The yoke is a way to add designer details to the top of your shirt. If your pattern does not include a yoke, learn how to create your own yoke pattern piece. Learn how notches help you align your pattern pieces and when you can safely clip them off. Finally, identify the pitfalls that are common when novice sewers try to customize a pattern. x
    • 26
      Adding Plackets & Stitching Sleeves
      Prepare your sleeves for plackets by adding pleats using a clever pinning trick. Learn how to read the placket pattern piece so you can accurately cut your fabric, mark it, pin it, and stitch it to the sleeve. It can seem like a lot of work for a small design feature, but it is one that takes your shirt from average to exceptional. x
    • 27
      Cuffs & Sleeves
      First, pin your front and back pieces together and use a construction stitch to attach them. Next, learn how to work with the difficult opposing curves of an armhole piece and sleeve piece so you can stitch shoulders that are smooth and don't have puckers. Then, sew the longest seam on your shirt, from the cuff to the armpit and then down the side. Finally, explore the variations you can do on a standard cuff. x
    • 28
      Adding a Collar & Stitching Shirt Front
      Add your front band to finish the front of your shirt and be ready for buttons—and do it all with only one seam! Add pins for perfectly positioned buttonholes. Stitch your upper and lower collar pieces, using interfacing to add stiffness to the fabric and trimming your seams to create crisp corners and smooth curves. Finally, get tips and tricks to perfect buttonholes. x
    • 29
      Selecting Jacket Size & Altering Pattern Pieces
      When it comes to sizes, outerwear measuring is different than measuring for shirts, pants, or skirts. Knowing how to measure correctly ensures the perfect fit for your new jacket. You'll see how to adjust collars and cuffs for height and shape to suit your sense of style, as well as how to design pockets that suit your hand size. Finally, learn how to add on to a jacket pattern to make the finished jacket longer. x
    • 30
      How to Sew the Modified Pattern Pieces
      If you've done modifications to your collar, pockets, length, or zipper, learn how to attach them to your original pattern pieces so they look like they were meant to be there all along. Your collar will lay flat, your pockets will be placed perfectly, and your zipper will zip easily every time. x
    • 31
      Adding a Lining & Stitching Sleeves
      Attach your sleeve linings in a way that you can avoid doing extra top stitching. If you did the pajama pants project, this is a logical extension of the technique used there. Attaching the sleeve will be easier with the knowledge you gained in the custom shirt lessons. While jackets are much bulkier pieces, your instructor will give you tips for working with the fabric. x
    • 32
      Spotlight Project: Knit Pencil Skirt
      Take your measurements to create a custom pattern for a pencil skirt in your exact size and preferred length. Learn how to set up your serger to create a solid side seam and how to test the fit so you can adjust your pattern on the fly. Follow along as you see how to sew a stretchy elastic waistband to stretchy knit fabric. x
    • 33
      Faux Fur & Leather
      Faux fur and faux leather (vegan leather, or pleather) use the same needles, foot, and techniques. Cut faux fur without tiny pieces of hair flying all over your sewing room and learn how to sew pieces of faux fur together in a way that looks seamless from the right side. Leather and faux leather cannot be pinned without permanent holes, so get tips for "pinning" these pieces without pins. x
    • 34
      Sequined & Sheer Fabrics & Lace
      Sequined fabrics, sheer fabrics, and lace can be frustrating to work with for beginners, but with the tips and tricks in this lesson, you'll be able to add these dramatic fabrics to your projects. Learn how to cut, prepare, pin, press, sew, and hem these fabrics with tricks your instructor has mastered over her years of experience. x
    • 35
      Quick Tips & Bonus Project
      Explore the ways you can maximize the potential in all fabrics from velvet and velour, to silks and satins, to embellished and textured fabrics. Practice your skills with pleather and velour to create a unique and stylish case to protect your eyeglasses. x
    • 36
      Sewing Laminates & Laminate Cutting Tips
      Learning to sew with laminates can greatly expand the number of projects you can tackle; because they are virtually waterproof and easy to wipe clean, you can make things you can't make with cotton. Explore the features and benefits of oilcloth, vinyl, and laminated cotton. Observe the most effective methods for cutting and caring for these tricky but infinitely useful materials. x
    • 37
      Vinyl/Oilcloth Receipt Wallet
      In this project, you will create a receipt wallet from oilcloth using a walking foot on your home sewing machine. Next, sew with clear vinyl to create zippered pockets for your wallet. Finally, join the vinyl to the oilcloth to complete the project. x
    • 38
      Laminated Cotton Receipt Wallet
      To appreciate the differences between oilcloth and laminated cotton, this lesson walks you through the same receipt wallet project using laminated cotton for the outer layer. Because of the natural fiber weave in laminated cotton, it is important to finish the raw edges so they do not fray. x
    • 39
      Spotlight Project: Oilcloth Money Wallet
      Oilcloth is durable, easy to keep clean, and comes in myriad colors and designs. Your instructor has created her own oilcloth wallet pattern, which holds credit cards and cash, has a pocket for coins and receipts, and closes securely with a metal snap. Best of all: you don't have to turn it right-side out when you're done sewing! x
    • 40
      Spotlight Project: Oilcloth Pleated Clutch
      Oilcloth is so affordable that you can create a bag for every occasion and in every color of the rainbow. In this project, you'll be creating visual interest by sewing pleats across the front of a clutch-style handbag. Your recently acquired skills in zipper installation and gusset creation will be put to the test with this thicker fabric. x
  • Learning Spanish II: How to Understand and Speak a New Language

    Professor Bill Worden, Associate Professor of Spanish

    Available Formats: Video Download, DVD

    This exciting second course in Spanish grounds you in the building blocks of fluency, giving you the thrill of communication in this global language. In each lesson, you’ll learn core grammar, the “skeleton” of the language; essential and useful vocabulary; and the cultures surrounding the Spanish language. Learning Spanish II takes you from the beginning stages of Spanish to a more advanced level of communicating in the language.

    View Lecture List (30)
    30 Lectures  |  Learning Spanish II: How to Understand and Speak a New Language
    Lecture Titles (30)
    • 1
      Essentials for Success with Spanish
      Begin by exploring key principles of effective language learning. Consider a core approach to building comprehension, focusing on linguistic cognates, context, and the use of conjecture. Then, do a spirited review of definite and indefinite articles, singular and plural nouns, and subject pronouns, and look at some new grammar and vocabulary. Finally, preview the material you’ll learn in the course. x
    • 2
      The Present Tense and Prepositions
      To build conversational skill, practice the present tense with verbs ending in “ar,” “er,” and “ir.” Then learn some vital irregular verbs and how to use them. Continue with prepositional pronouns (as in “near me” or “next to her”), and some new prepositions (such as “beneath” and “behind”). Finish with a look at the four-part structure of the course, and how to get the most from it. x
    • 3
      Indirect Objects and Verbs like Gustar
      Here, tackle a variety of new material. Start with a thorough look at indirect object pronouns (as in “to/for you” or “to/for us”), and verbs that use them. Work with a highly useful verb, gustar, which expresses what someone likes or doesn’t like, and with other verbs which function similarly. Then explore the geography of the Spanish-speaking world, and adjectives of nationality. x
    • 4
      Spanish Pronunciation and Reciprocal Verbs
      Look at ways to develop excellent pronunciation in Spanish. In particular, practice Spanish consonant sounds that don’t exist in English, focusing on the Spanish “r.” Investigate reflexive verbs, and how to use them in conversational speech. Last, study reciprocal verbs, which describe actions done by people to each other, and observe how they work within a romantic story spoken in Spanish. x
    • 5
      Advanced Work with the Preterite Tense
      First, learn useful vocabulary relating to the kitchen and cooking. Then study grammatical constructions that use the present tense to talk about the past. Delve deeply into the preterite tense, which expresses past actions that are viewed as completed or ended. Sharpen your command of the preterite with key verbs such as tener (to have), ver (to see), dar (to give), and ir (to go). x
    • 6
      Introduction to the Imperfect Tense
      Explore important vocabulary regarding time, and how to use it conversationally. Then work with the imperfect tense, which expresses ongoing actions in the past, conditions or characteristics in the past, time or age in the past, and habitual past actions. Practice forming the imperfect with all categories of verbs, and grasp how the imperfect is used in Spanish compared with English. x
    • 7
      When to Use the Imperfect and the Preterite
      Learn to distinguish between contexts where the preterite is the necessary tense and others where it's best to use the imperfect. As a case in point, see what happens when an action in the past interrupts another action that is in progress. Work briefly with the verb haber (to have) in the preterite and the imperfect. Finally, learn about one of the most important novels in Spanish literature. x
    • 8
      How to Expand Your Spanish Vocabulary
      Investigate a two-step approach to incorporating new words in Spanish as an active part of your vocabulary. Next, focus on the Spanish pronoun se, and its essential use in passive and impersonal expressions. Then learn the imperfect progressive construction, vital for conversation, which emphasizes the ongoing nature of past actions. Observe the use of verb tenses in a story from Cervantes. x
    • 9
      Mastering the Imperfect and the Preterite
      Learn a range of new vocabulary relating to the family. Then take a look at verbs that change meaning depending on their context. Observe how some important verbs have different meanings in the preterite and the imperfect, and how others change meaning when used in the positive as opposed to the negative. Also grasp three rules regarding which syllables to stress when speaking Spanish. x
    • 10
      Mastering Direct and Double Object Pronouns
      Improve your Spanish pronunciation by working with key vowel and consonant sounds that we may think are the same as English, but are in fact different. Continue with direct object pronouns (as in, “I see them.”), and double object pronouns, where two pronouns occur within a sentence (“We send them to him.”). Learn how to build skill with these vital elements of conversation. x
    • 11
      Expressing Possession in Spanish
      Begin this lesson with some highly useful vocabulary regarding shopping. Contemplate three qualities of successful language learners, and how to maximize your own learning of Spanish. Then work in depth with possessive adjectives (as in “my” or “your”), and possessive pronouns (“mine” or “yours”), and practice them in many different conversational settings where they appear. x
    • 12
      Using Se to Talk about Unplanned Events
      Continue your work with Spanish pronunciation by practicing sounds which can be tricky for learners, such as the Spanish “b,” “s,” and “d” sounds. Next, learn a useful verbal construction that expresses accidental or unplanned events, such as when someone breaks or forgets something. Finally, take a thorough look at Spanish spelling, and some of the challenges it presents for English speakers. x
    • 13
      The Present Perfect Tense
      Following work with new vocabulary, delve into the past participles of verbs. In particular, investigate their use as adjectives (as in, “I’m prepared”). Then learn five additional words used in talking about time in different contexts. End this lesson by exploring the present perfect tense (as in “We have slept”), how to conjugate it, and when to use it in expressing yourself in Spanish. x
    • 14
      Past Participles as Adjectives and Nouns
      Deepen your work with some core elements of conversational fluency. First, refine your knowledge of past participles; both their use in the present perfect tense and their use as adjectives. Practice the present perfect tense with pronouns (such as, “We’ve given it to them”), with adverbs (as in “I’ve never met Juan”), and discover how Spanish past participles can also function as nouns. x
    • 15
      The Future Tense
      Learn two ways to express future actions without using the future tense; one, using the present tense to describe future actions, and, two, using the Spanish construction meaning that one is “going to” do something. Then learn the less used future tense, some key expressions regarding the future, and note how the future tense is also used to express uncertainty or conjecture. x
    • 16
      Cognates and False Cognates
      Consider the value of making a good first impression when you begin communicating with Spanish speakers. With this in mind, learn a group of effective “conversation openers,” to engage with the person you’re speaking to. Continue with a range of new vocabulary, and take a close look at the frequency and usefulness of cognates in Spanish—words that are the same as or similar to words in English. x
    • 17
      The Conditional Tense
      In approaching the conditional, note how this tense is used in English to express potential actions, and to be polite, and how it functions similarly in Spanish. Review the five tenses you've learned so far, and observe how adding new tenses becomes easier as you progress. Learn to conjugate the conditional, and practice its application, including its use to express probability in the past. x
    • 18
      Uses of the Infinitive
      Explore Spanish nouns that are directly related to verbs, highlighting nouns that end in the suffix “-miento.” Continue with a look at important uses of the infinitive in Spanish; its use as a subject (“I like to cook”), an object (“We want to eat now”), and in commands. Also work with three highly useful verbs: dejar (to leave), and sentirse and sentir, which express how or what someone feels. x
    • 19
      Relative Adverbs and Relative Pronouns
      Extend your skill with the infinitive with important additional ways to use it, such as its use as a noun. Also deepen your work with interrogatives, focusing on questions involving “what” and “which.” Then delve into the use of relative adverbs and relative pronouns, words which link the first part of a sentence with what comes afterwards. x
    • 20
      Mastering the Uses of Estar and Ser
      A grasp of how to use the verbs estar and ser (both of which mean “to be”), is fundamental for communicating in Spanish. Here, study five primary contexts for using estar, followed by eight core uses of ser. Also note cases where both ser and estar are possible. Conclude this lesson by considering how to develop the most effective mental attitude for learning Spanish. x
    • 21
      Advanced Work with Adverbs and Adjectives
      Refine your facility in Spanish with a review of the three types of adverbs, adding some vital adverbial expressions, such as con frecuencia (frequently). Explore Spanish adjectives which can come before nouns, and nouns that end with the suffix “-ión.” Then, learn about Gabriel García Márquez’s Cien años de soledad, one of the two most important and influential novels ever written in Spanish. x
    • 22
      How to Use Para and Por
      Add more adverbs and adjectives to your vocabulary, and learn how to change adjectives into nouns. Study how to use two of the most important prepositions, which can be challenging for Spanish learners: para and por, both of which translate into English as “for.” Learn the key contexts for each, and the usage differences you must grasp to speak Spanish correctly. x
    • 23
      The Evolution of the Spanish Language
      Trace the origins of Spanish, beginning with the early Iberian languages and the introduction of Latin by the Romans. Follow the process by which Latin developed into castellano, or modern Spanish. Learn to make comparisons in Spanish, both of equality and inequality. Also study adjectives which mean one thing when used before a noun, and something else when used after it. x
    • 24
      Health and Well-Being in Spanish
      This lecture introduces a wide range of vocabulary regarding health. Learn to speak about medicine and doctors, the parts of the human body, and about various common health problems and their remedies. Continue with important vocabulary regarding pleasure and enjoyment. Practice using the preterite and imperfect tenses. Then, consider some ways to accelerate your learning of Spanish. x
    • 25
      Advanced Work with Commands
      Take a deeper look at commands in Spanish, which you will use constantly in conversation. Begin with informal commands in the second person singular and plural. Then work with the more complex formal commands, negative commands, and commands in the first person plural. Study the geography of the U.S.-Mexico border, and the Mexican states and cities that adjoin the region. x
    • 26
      Introduction to the Subjunctive Mood
      The subjunctive mood in Spanish expresses subjectivity on the part of the speaker. Look into the meanings of this important mood, how to conjugate many verbs in the present tense of the subjunctive, and how to use it in one specific context: with expressions of desire. Also investigate the historic influence of Germanic languages on Spanish, particularly regarding Spanish vocabulary. x
    • 27
      Expressing Doubt with the Subjunctive
      Look again at the question of assimilating new words in Spanish, and steps you can take to expand your vocabulary. Practice the subjunctive as it's used in expressions of doubt or uncertainty, and also with certain important impersonal expressions. Learn new vocabulary relating to the world of art. Then explore the life and works of the great Renaissance painter, El Greco. x
    • 28
      Expressing Influence with the Subjunctive
      Review the uses of the subjunctive mood that you've learned to this point, and the typical structure of sentences where the subjunctive appears. Continue with a new context for the subjunctive: expressions of influence. Learn more useful impersonal expressions that require the subjunctive. Finally, take account of the enormous impact of Arabic language and culture on Spanish. x
    • 29
      Expressing Emotion with the Subjunctive
      Practice using some key Spanish verbs that have to do with the act of seeing or looking. Then, study another context for the subjunctive mood—the expression of emotion—along with some new vocabulary relating to emotional states. Consider an important way to think about language learning. Also discover another important influence on Spanish: the indigenous languages of the New World. x
    • 30
      Next Steps toward Spanish Fluency
      In this last lesson, learn about the different varieties of Spanish spoken around the world, and the differences you'll encounter in grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation. Continue with a look at some new and useful vocabulary. Conclude by taking stock of where you are in your Spanish studies, and some key ideas on how to keep moving forward. x
  • Screenwriting 101: Mastering the Art of Story

    Professor Angus Fletcher, Ph.D.

    Available Formats: Video Download, Audio Download, DVD, CD

    Writing a script is simply another way of telling a story, albeit one with its own special set of possibilities and limitations. This course will provide you with the invaluable ability to appreciate more films and TV, tell better stories, and write your own scripts. How you decide to use these limitless creative possibilities is up to you.

    View Lecture List (24)
    24 Lectures  |  Screenwriting 101: Mastering the Art of Story
    Lecture Titles (24)
    • 1
      Thinking like a Screenwriter
      Before "Lights! Camera! Action!" there is one thing a film must have: a good story. This first lecture introduces you to the importance of story and Professor Fletcher's unique approach to it. Look to the literary past to see how the earliest stories shape the ones we create today and use that knowledge to look at scripts and storytelling. You may be surprised to discover how cognitive science can shed light on how humans experience stories. x
    • 2
      Reverse Engineering Successful Scripts
      The first question any writer must ask is: where do I want to take my audience? Professor Fletcher shows you how to reverse engineer stories to pinpoint their cognitive effects and put those tools to use in your own writing (and viewing) experiences. Travel back to the dawn of scriptwriting and reverse engineer three major storytelling innovations of ancient Greece, connecting each to a successful modern film script. x
    • 3
      Building Your Story World
      Every script has a setting, both a time and a place where the story occurs. Your “story world” is, however, more than the physical or temporal—what makes the world are the rules you create for it. Understand the value of the rules that underlie your story and see how genres allow you to use pre-existing structures while enabling you to embrace a multitude of possibilities. Then, look at the “big three” genres: Tragedy, Comedy, and Heroic. x
    • 4
      Developing Your Characters
      Character is the key ingredient in most successful stories; make great characters and audiences will want to follow them anywhere. Professor Fletcher presents a simple recipe for creating memorable characters with three simple ingredients. Discover why fear is the most powerful driver of human behavior and why this is a key to creating and sustaining great characters. x
    • 5
      Tone: The Screenwriter's Lens
      One thing budding screenwriters often forget is this: you are not the director. Your job as the writer is to create a great story; the rest of the work is up to others. So how do you make sure your story creates the cognitive effect you want? The answer is tone. Look at the two most important ways writers shape tone and then dive into four influential tones used in screenwriting, using both literature and award-winning scripts as your guide. x
    • 6
      Plotting Your Story Beats
      One of the most common pitfalls of scriptwriting is poor plotting. The human mind is actually designed to plot—the key is learning how to constrain this natural tendency so your story doesn’t simply wander. See how plotting backwards can help you stay on track and why you should forget about creating a three-act structure. x
    • 7
      Sentimental Return: Casablanca
      Begin your exploration of great film scripts with Casablanca. Learn how to identify its cognitive effect and reverse engineer the four main story components to unlock the tools you will use to understand every script. Casablanca will also introduce you to the first of the “big three” storytelling genres: the heroic. x
    • 8
      The Tragic Sublime: The Godfather
      How does a script go through 19 rewrites and multiple directors to emerge as one of the most influential films of the 20th century? Reverse engineer this story that traces its roots back to ancient Rome and see how a sublime tragedy can be even more powerful when brought down to a human scale. x
    • 9
      Romantic Satisfaction: When Harry Met Sally…
      The basic plot of all romantic comedies is essentially the same, so the surprise success of When Harry Met Sally can teach writers volumes about all the other ways you can make a story great. Professor Fletcher demonstrates the subtle ways screenwriters can add naturalistic details to make a predictable story still feel realistic and rewarding. x
    • 10
      Suspense and Relief: Jaws
      Take a look at the film whose immense success gave us the term “blockbuster,” examining why the feeling of relief is one of the most primordial of human emotions and how it can best be put to use in good storytelling. Also gain an appreciation for the value of improvisation and collaboration with actors in the filmmaking process. x
    • 11
      Romantic Longing: Annie Hall
      A comedy with an ending more like a tragedy and with a tone that effortlessly fuses irony and sentiment, Annie Hall was an instant success that almost didn't happen. Use what you have learned about reverse engineering stories to better understand how to reach your ultimate (psychological) destination in a script. x
    • 12
      Big Wonder: Star Wars
      The influence of Joseph Campbell and the idea of an archetypal journey have long been credited as part of the success of George Lucas’s epic space opera. However, neuroscience has since debunked the idea of this “monomyth” and Professor Fletcher shows you how the power of the script comes down to something much simpler: childlike wonder. x
    • 13
      Charm: The Princess Bride
      The Princess Bride is the first film thus far that was not a hit on its initial release. Instead, its popularity grew slowly over time, engaging small audiences who were connected by a sense of being “in on the secret”—the essence of charm. Solve the riddle of how two different worlds can actually be the same and discover why community can be an important element of storytelling. x
    • 14
      Alienation Effect: Do the Right Thing
      Most Hollywood films use simple but strong emotional effects to lull audiences into an easy enjoyment in a world with moral certainty. But some movies want to make you think critically and offer no easy answers. Ambivalence can be a crucial tool for writers who want to challenge audiences and this lecture will show you how it can be used to powerful effect. x
    • 15
      Redemption: Unforgiven
      The gritty soul of the Western genre was revived by the release of Unforgiven—a film that is not just a lesson in great genre writing, but in how to bring old stories back to life. Look at the ways the various story elements help create an anti-hero audiences will root for as you explore how a seemingly forgotten genre can be revived with the right script at the right time. x
    • 16
      Surreal Connection: Pulp Fiction
      Film scripts often use literary techniques to build the story world, form characters, and set the right tone. By adopting a collage method taken from the surrealist movement, Pulp Fiction shows that visual arts can influence story in much the same way. Explore the various ways connections can be made between seemingly unrelated characters and events. x
    • 17
      Big Sympathy: Toy Story
      How did a film that began as a computer demo become an unexpected smash hit? Solve this mystery as you discover why having an engineering mindset can be a great advantage in screenwriting, and reveal how Pixar changed the direction of Disney films for years to come—by looking at a surprisingly dark side of storytelling. x
    • 18
      Existential Meaning: Fargo
      Some films defy easy explanation. Fargo is an eccentric story that uses its oddities to its advantage—like delaying the appearance of the main character for almost a third of the film. Explore existentialism and see what can happen when writers stop thinking about fixed structure and focus on the desired result. x
    • 19
      Film versus Television: MASH and M*A*S*H
      Begin your transition from the big screen to the small by looking at the different ways television and film scripts approach storytelling. See why the conflicts and plotting of TV must operate differently from film to sustain story over time and how you can determine which format is best for the kind of story you want to tell. x
    • 20
      Writing a Television Pilot: Game of Thrones
      Follow Professor Fletcher as he shows you how a television pilot works. Or, in the case of the original Game of Thrones pilot, how it doesn't. Compare the initial failed script with the later successful one and see how a story can be reshaped to better achieve its desired effect and discover why writing a TV pilot is like building an engine. x
    • 21
      The Sitcom: The Simpsons
      In the first of three lectures focused on successful TV genres, look at the longest running sitcom in television history, The Simpsons. This lecture shows you why jokes are not the key to humor; it’s all in the characters and their ongoing conflict with the world around them. Look at the episode “Duffless” and see how it works as a great example of sitcom writing. x
    • 22
      The Procedural: CSI
      The success of the procedural story harkens back to the Victorian heyday of Sherlock Holmes, whose adventures always followed a similar pattern but with important variations. This same technique drives the success of shows like CSI, as this lecture demonstrates by looking at the pilot episode, which encapsulates the show's combination of problem solving and problem making. x
    • 23
      The Prime-Time Soap: Grey's Anatomy
      See why soap operas are an enduring and brilliant form of storytelling, despite their reputation. By focusing on the subjective and the most primal of human emotions, soap operas allow viewers to experience deep feelings that may be difficult or absent in real life. Grey's Anatomy shows how the conflict between wanting to belong and feeling like an outsider can fuel this kind of storytelling. x
    • 24
      Becoming a Screenwriter
      Professor Fletcher concludes the course with a look at the ultimate goals of Screenwriting 101: to help you appreciate more film and TV; tell better stories; and write your own scripts. As he takes you through each of these points and sums up the scope of the course, he also gives invaluable practical advice on how to become a screenwriter from a professional perspective. And that's a wrap. x
  • The Psychology of Performance: How to Be Your Best in Life

    Clinical Sport Psychologist Eddie O'Connor, Ph.D.

    Available Formats: Video Download, Audio Download, DVD, CD

    In The Psychology of Performance: How to Be Your Best in Life, clinical sport psychologist Eddie O’Connor, Ph.D., shares the best ways for you to reach your personal performance goals based on the latest scientific research—whether your performance environment is music, dance, business, or sport. These often surprising research results will make you rethink your own strategies, offering approaches you might never have considered and busting myths you might have taken as truth.

    View Lecture List (24)
    24 Lectures  |  The Psychology of Performance: How to Be Your Best in Life
    Lecture Titles (24)
    • 1
      Sport and Performance Psychology
      Sport psychology uses psychological knowledge and skills to help athletes achieve optimal performance, while caring for their overall well-being and development. This lecture begins your introduction to a relatively new field, revealing the science behind the most appropriate cognitive and physical practices leading to top performance. x
    • 2
      Deliberate Practice: Essential for Experts
      You say you don’t have athletic talent? You’ll be surprised to learn talent is overrated and can even become a disadvantage in the long run. Instead, discover the benefits of focusing your attention on practice—deliberate, purposeful practice with well-defined goals. That’s the way to challenge your brain and body to grow and adapt to achieve expertise. x
    • 3
      How Values and Goals Drive Performance
      If you want to reach your best performance level, you'll need to answer this one very important question: Why? Identifying what you want your performance life to be about will help determine your goals and values, and they will guide you through the hard work, wins, and losses ahead. x
    • 4
      The Benefits of Mindfulness in Performance
      Performers in any sport or art must be aware, intentional, and purposeful in focus, attention, and action. While the application of mindfulness meditation to sports performance is in its infancy, initial scientific studies reveal both short- and long-term benefits. Learn about the three major models of mindfulness and how to best apply them to your practice and performance. x
    • 5
      When Positive Thinking Doesn't Work
      We’ve all heard it: “Think positive! You can do it!” But when it comes to peak performance, is positive thinking a help or a hindrance? Cognitive defusion can help you see your thoughts for what they really are—experiences inside your head and nothing more. Gain the power of choosing which thoughts to follow and which to ignore. x
    • 6
      Acceptance and the Willingness to Feel
      All human emotions are based upon these basic four: anger, fear, happiness, and sadness. So why should you expect to be happy and positive all the time? That's only one out of four! Learn to accept the full range of your thoughts and emotions in order to free up your energy to focus on your performance goals and values. x
    • 7
      Commitment Means "No Matter What"
      If you want to achieve your peak performance potential, you know you must be committed. But committed to what? To the behaviors that lead to success. Will you prioritize commitment to your art, your sport, team, coach—or to the long-term goals and values you set for yourself? Learn how that choice affects your performance. x
    • 8
      Finding Internal Motivation
      What keeps elite performers motivated, continually sacrificing so much for their art or sport? Although coaches and parents sometimes think they are in charge of motivation, self-determination theory says humans have an inherent need for three things: competence, relatedness, and autonomy—to be good, to have connections to other people, and to be in control of their own lives. Understand your intrinsic motivation and see how it is the activating force for maximal growth. x
    • 9
      Using Imagery to Prepare for Action
      Athletes and coaches have believed in the power of visualization and have used it in their practice for decades. Now, medical imaging reveals exactly how imagery impacts the brain and the body's nervous system. See how musculature, respiration, and circulation are all stimulated for the betterment of eventual performance when this mental rehearsal is used to its best advantage. x
    • 10
      Confidence and Self-Talk
      Self-efficacy and sport confidence affect your ability to reach your practice and performance goals. But what are the sources of self-efficacy and how can you incorporate them into your life? Learn the ways in which instructional and motivational self-talk can work in your favor as a part of your training routine. x
    • 11
      Developing Focused Attention
      Focused attention is the single most important psychological skill for all performers, whether executive or athlete. But is it possible for us to fully control our attention? And what can go wrong when we try? Learn why hyper-accessibility will inevitably lead to problems and how the five principles of effective concentration can improve your performance outcomes. x
    • 12
      Superstitions, Rituals, and Routines
      What’s the difference between an athlete’s legitimate pre-performance ritual and a long-held superstition? Routines are always under the athlete’s control and directly improve performance. Superstitions—which tend to be more prevalent among athletes the higher their achievement level and number of years played—include some magical thinking and are not directly helpful. So why are there so many superstitious performers? x
    • 13
      Peak Performance: Getting in the Zone
      If you’ve ever stumbled into “the zone,” you know you want to get there again. Also known as flow, the zone is that time when you’re doing your sport, art, or job without thinking, just flowing from moment to moment, completely immersed. Learn how to prepare mentally and physically to increase your chances of entering this optimal performance state. x
    • 14
      Performance Anxiety and Choking
      Anxiety is normal, and every performer is familiar with its physiological symptoms. But it does not have to negatively affect your performance. Learn about Quiet Eye training and how it can be applied in a variety of athletic or artistic situations. QE techniques can help draw internal attention away from anxiety and refocus attention on the critical physical actions of performance. x
    • 15
      Being the Perfect Perfectionist
      Perfectionism is a paradox faced by almost all elite performers. It energizes achievement and contributes to success, but can also undermine performance and/or the enjoyment of success. Learn how to become a “perfect perfectionist,” using its positive attributes to your benefit while avoiding the perfectionist’s battle with feelings of shame and lack of self-worth. x
    • 16
      Self-Compassion for Self-Improvement
      Athletes know all about boxing up their feelings in order to get tough, get the job done, and cope with crises. But research shows routinely taking time to acknowledge and process your feelings affects the psychological variables that improve performance. Learn how specific exercises can help you increase self-compassion and get results. x
    • 17
      Burnout and the Need for Recovery
      The consequences of burnout can be devastating. Beginning with an exhaustion no amount of rest can relieve, burnout spirals downward through declining performance, frustration, decreasing motivation, and devaluation. Explore the underlying causes behind burnout, how to avoid and treat the problem, and the serious issue of burnout in today's youth sports. x
    • 18
      Pain Tolerance and Injury Rehabilitation
      If you’re an athlete striving for your highest performance level, pain and injury are just part of the game. But pain is never experienced in a vacuum. See how, for each athlete, pain exists within a unique bio-psycho-social context—the matrix that influences the athlete’s individual relationship to pain and the choice of association or dissociation strategies for moving forward. x
    • 19
      The Dangerous Pursuit of the Ideal Body
      Athletes can feel tremendous pressure to achieve the “ideal body” as early as elementary school. Consequently, although most of us recognize disordered eating and performance-enhancing drugs as problems, athletes can see them as short-term positives despite long-term damage. What does the latest research reveal regarding the health risks of methods many athletes use to improve sport performance? x
    • 20
      Fan Psychology, Identification, and Violence
      Teams need their fans, and fans need their teams. Uncover what the latest research says about the difference in the social and emotional health of higher- and lower-identified fans. Learn how being a fan can make you happy. Explore as well the risks and darker side of passionate fandom—not only does your level of identification affect your mood and enjoyment, but also your potential for anger and violence. x
    • 21
      Four Qualities of a Successful Team
      Learn how the four correlates of teamwork—cohesion, cooperation, role relationships, and leadership—function together to best enable sport teams to reach their goals. No matter whether you’re in the world of sports or business, the Team Captain’s Leadership Model will show you how to lead by example to better your team and yourself. x
    • 22
      Talent: A Developmental Process
      Understand why the typical talent identification model works against the development of athletic talent in youngsters. Instead, turn to another model, the Developmental Model of Sports Participation, which research shows promotes the physical health and psychosocial development of all children involved in youth sport—in addition to most effectively promoting the development of specialized expertise. x
    • 23
      How to Be a Great Sport Parent
      Whether parents want to help their children develop into successful achievers in sports, art, music, or life, it’s important to remember that everything you say and do matters. Learn how to avoid the most common mistakes sports parents make—words and actions that work against your child’s goals and your own—and what you can say that your child always needs to hear. x
    • 24
      Aging Athletes: Competing and Retiring
      Learn what it takes to keep up skills and performance levels as we age. With appropriate planning, older athletes can often compete well beyond the age of peak performance and even remain competitive compared to their younger peers. But the time will eventually come to retire from your sport, and the sooner you start preparing for that transition, the better you will feel about it. x
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