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  • Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: How Life Works

    Professor Kevin Ahern, PhD

    Available Formats: Instant Video, DVD
    Taught by Professor Kevin Ahern of Oregon State University, this course covers the essential topics of a first-semester college course in biochemistry and molecular biology, introducing amino acids, proteins, enzymes, genes, and dealing with the intricate workings of living cells. A background in high school-level chemistry is helpful.
    View Lecture List (36)
    Taught by Professor Kevin Ahern of Oregon State University, this course covers the essential topics of a first-semester college course in biochemistry and molecular biology, introducing amino acids, proteins, enzymes, genes, and dealing with the intricate workings of living cells. A background in high school-level chemistry is helpful.
    View Lecture List (36)
    36 Lectures  |  Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: How Life Works
    Lecture Titles (36)
    • 1
      Biochemistry Is the Science of Us
      Get started on the subject that Professor Ahern calls the science of us"- biochemistry and its allied field molecular biology, which both tell us who we are. Discover the handful of elements involved in biochemical reactions; the bonds they form; and the wide array of molecules that result, including amino acids, which are the building blocks of proteins. Also, learn about the major types of living cells." x
    • 2
      Why Water Is Essential for Life
      Investigate why water is so singularly suited to life. Composed of two hydrogen atoms for each oxygen atom, water molecules have a polar charge due to the uneven arrangement of shared electrons. See how this simple feature allows water to dissolve sugars and salts, while leaving oils and fats untouched. Also learn what makes water solutions acidic or basic, and how this property is measured on the pH scale. x
    • 3
      Amino Acids: 20 Building Blocks of Life
      Take a tour through the 20 amino acids that link together in different combinations and sequences to build proteins. Besides water, proteins are the most abundant molecules in all known forms of life. Also the most diverse class of biological molecules, proteins make up everything from enzymes and hormones to antibodies and muscle cells-all based on an alphabet of 20 basic building blocks. x
    • 4
      From Peptide Bonds to Protein Structure
      Learn how peptide bonds join amino acids to form an almost unlimited number of protein types. The order of amino acids matters, but even more important are the shapes they form. Survey primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary protein structures, with examples-from silk (a fibrous protein with mostly secondary structure) to the intricately folded hemoglobin protein (a quaternary structure). x
    • 5
      Protein Folding, Misfolding, and Disorder
      Discover how proteins fold into complex shapes, often with the help of molecular chaperones. Then learn the deadly consequences of proteins that do not fold properly, leading to degenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and prion diseases. Also look at intrinsically disordered proteins, which lack a fixed structure, permitting flexible interactions with other biomolecules. x
    • 6
      Hemoglobin Function Follows Structure
      Hemoglobin is the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen from lungs to tissues and then takes away carbon dioxide for exhalation. Learn how structure is the key to this complicated and vital function. Also see how variant forms of hemoglobin, such as fetal hemoglobin and the mutation behind sickle cell anemia, can have life-saving or fatal consequences-all depending on structure. x
    • 7
      Enzymes' Amazing Speed and Specificity
      Witness how structure and function are related in enzymes, which are a group of proteins that stimulate biochemical reactions to run at astonishing speed. One example is OMP decarboxylase, an enzyme that produces a crucial component of DNA in a blistering 0.02 second, versus the 78 million years that the reaction would normally take! Analyze the mechanisms behind these apparent superpowers. x
    • 8
      Enzyme Regulation in Cells
      How do cells control the tremendous power of enzymes? Study the ways that cells regulate enzyme activity by directing the synthesis and breakdown of biomolecules. One reason biochemists care so much about enzymes is that many medical conditions result from enzyme activity that is excessive or insufficient. Consider examples such as hemophilia, hypertension, and high cholesterol. x
    • 9
      Fatty Acids, Fats, and Other Lipids
      Lipids are a varied group of molecules that include fats, oils, waxes, steroids, hormones, and some vitamins. Survey the fats that obsess us in our diets and body shapes, notably triglycerides in their saturated and unsaturated forms. Then explore the role lipids play in energy storage and cell membrane structure, and cover the multitude of health benefits of the lipid vitamins: A, D, E, and K. x
    • 10
      Sugars: Glucose and the Carbohydrates
      Probe the biochemistry of sugars that provide us with instant energy, feed our brains, direct proteins to their destinations, and communicate the identity of our cells. On the other hand, when present in large quantities they can lead to Type 2 diabetes, and the wrong sugar markers on transfused blood cells can even kill us. x
    • 11
      ATP and Energy Transformations in Cells
      Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is the fuel that powers many processes in living cells. Every day we make and break down our own body weight in ATP. Focus on the chemical reactions behind this impressive energy conversion system, which is governed by the Gibbs free energy equation. These reactions, which can proceed either forward or backward, are among the most important in biochemistry. x
    • 12
      Breaking Down Sugars and Fatty Acids
      A metabolic pathway is a series of biochemical reactions, where the product of one serves as the substrate for the next. Biochemists compare these pathways to road maps that show the network of reactions leading from one chemical to the next. Follow the metabolic pathway called glycolysis that breaks up glucose and other sugars. Then trace the route for fatty acid oxidation. x
    • 13
      Metabolism Meets at the Citric Acid Cycle
      The products from the reactions in the previous lecture now enter the Krebs citric acid cycle. The outcome of these reactions, in turn, link to many other pathways, with the Krebs cycle serving as the hub directing the intricate traffic of metabolic intermediates. After decoding the Krebs cycle, use it to illuminate a deep mystery about cancer cells, which suggests new therapies for the disease. x
    • 14
      Energy Harvesting in Animals and Plants
      Thus far, your investigations have accounted for only part of the energy available from food. So where's all the ATP? In this lecture, see how ATP is produced in abundance in both animal and plant cells, largely via mitochondria (in animals and plants) and chloroplasts (in plants only). You also learn why we need oxygen to stay alive and how poisons such as cyanide do their deadly work. x
    • 15
      How Animals Make Carbs and Fats
      Take a tour of cell manufacturing, focusing on metabolic pathways that use energy to synthesize key molecules, including sugars, complex carbohydrates, fatty acids, and other lipids. Along the way, learn why alcohol and exercise don't mix, how our bodies create short- and long-term energy stores, and why some essential fatty acids can lead to health problems if their ratios are not optimal. x
    • 16
      Cholesterol, Membranes, Lipoproteins
      The word cholesterol" evokes fear in anyone worried about coronary artery disease. But what is this ubiquitous lipid and how harmful is it? Examine the key steps in cholesterol synthesis, learn about its important role in membranes, and discover where LDLs ("bad" cholesterol) and HDLs ("good") come from. It isn't cholesterol alone that is plugging arteries in atherosclerosis." x
    • 17
      Metabolic Control during Exercise and Rest
      See how cells manage complex and interconnected metabolic pathways, especially in response to exercise and a sedentary lifestyle. Then discover the secret of warm-blooded animals and what newborn babies have in common with hibernating grizzly bears-with lessons for combatting obesity. Also, learn about a drug from the 1930s that helped people burn fat in their sleep-as it killed them. x
    • 18
      How Plants Make Carbs and Other Metabolites
      Study how plants use sunlight and reduction reactions to build carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water. This synthesis of food from air and water occurs in a series of reactions called the Calvin cycle. While humans exploit plants for food and fiber, we also utilize a multitude of other plant molecules called secondary metabolites. These include flavors, dyes, caffeine, and even catnip. x
    • 19
      Recycling Nitrogen: Amino Acids, Nucleotides
      Nitrogen is a key component of amino acids, DNA, and RNA, yet animal and plant cells are unable to extract free nitrogen from air. See how bacteria come to the rescue. Then follow the flow of nitrogen from bacteria to plants to us. Also look at strategies for reducing our reliance on environmentally unsound nitrogen fertilizers by exploiting the secret of 16-feet-tall corn plants found in Mexico. x
    • 20
      Eating, Antioxidants, and the Microbiome
      Discover how to eat in a way that minimizes harm and efficiently fixes the inevitable damage from living. Learn that certain cooking methods can increase the formation of harmful compounds. And substances such as antioxidants found in some foods can reduce the impact of damaging chemical reactions within cells. Also cover recent findings about gut bacteria that have changed our views about diet. x
    • 21
      Hormones, Stress, and Cell Division
      Cellular communication depends on specific molecular interactions, where the message and the receiver are biomolecules. Follow this process for signaling molecules such as the hormones epinephrine, adrenalin, and epidermal growth factor, which stimulates cells to divide. Cellular signaling is like the children's game called telephone, except the message is usually conveyed accurately! x
    • 22
      Neurotransmitters, the Brain, and Addiction
      When you touch a hot stove, you recoil instantly. How do nerve cells process information so quickly? Trace nerve impulses-which involve electrical signals and neurotransmitters-as they pass from neuron to neuron, and from neuron to muscle cells. Study molecules that block nerve transmissions, such as snake venom and Botox treatments, and look at the role of dopamine in addiction behaviors. x
    • 23
      The Biochemistry of Our Senses
      Most of the reactions you have studied so far occur outside everyday awareness. Now investigate the most important biochemical signals that we habitually notice: the molecular reactions that give rise to the five senses. Analyze the sensory origins of colors, sounds, tastes, smells, and touch, mapping them through the nervous system. Observe how the senses are tuned" to enhance our survival." x
    • 24
      From Biochemistry to Molecular Biology
      Trace the pathways of two widely ingested molecules: caffeine and fructose. Caffeine fools the body-usually harmlessly-into increasing glucose in the blood, while too much fructose can lead to unhealthy accumulation of fat in the liver. Then focus on two topics that link with the upcoming molecular biology segment of the course: androgen insensitivity and the molecular mechanisms of aging. x
    • 25
      DNA and RNA: Information in Structure
      Advance into the last third of the course, where you cover molecular biology, which deals with the biochemistry of reproduction. Zero in on DNA and how its double-helix structure relates to its function. Then look at the single-stranded RNA molecule, which is a central link in the process, DNA makes RNA makes protein." Also consider how viruses flourish with very little DNA or RNA." x
    • 26
      DNA Replication in Bacteria; PCR in the Lab
      Focus on DNA's ability to replicate by matching complementary base pairs to separated strands of the helix. Several specialized enzymes are involved, as well as temporary segments of RNA. Explore this process in bacteria. Then investigate the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a Nobel Prize-winning technique for copying DNA segments in the lab, which has sparked a biotechnology revolution. x
    • 27
      Chromosome Replication, Telomeres, Aging
      Examine the cell cycle of eukaryotic cells like our own and the cycle's effect on DNA replication. Discover that a quirk in the copying of linear DNA leads to shrinking of chromosomes as cells age, a problem reversed in egg and sperm cells by the telomerase enzyme. For this reason, telomerase might appear to be the secret to immortality except its unregulated presence in cells can lead to cancer. x
    • 28
      DNA Mismatch and Excision Repair
      Cells go to great lengths to prevent mutations. Luckily, these measures are not quite perfect, since nature relies on mutations to drive evolution. Study the methods that cells use to minimize alterations to their DNA. Find that DNA repair can interfere with cancer treatment, when the malignant cells survive medical therapy by repairing their DNA faster than the treatment can halt the repair. x
    • 29
      DNA Recombination, Gene Editing, CRISPR
      Delve deeper into DNA replication, learning that a process called genetic recombination assures that no two individuals will have the same DNA, unless they are twins derived from a single fertilized egg. Trace the new technologies that have arisen from our understanding of recombination and repair of DNA, notably CRISPR, which permits precise alteration of gene sequences. x
    • 30
      Transcribing DNA to RNA
      RNA is more than simply a copy of the DNA blueprint. Focus on the synthesis of RNA, covering how it differs from DNA replication. Also learn how human cells shuffle their genetic code to make about 100,000 different proteins using fewer than 30,000 coding sequences. Finally, see how knowledge of transcription occurring after death helps forensic scientists establish the time of death accurately. x
    • 31
      Translating RNA into Proteins
      Learn how cells solve the problem of reading information in messenger RNA and using it to direct protein synthesis. Focus on how different parts of the translation apparatus work together through sequence-specific interactions. Also discover how antibiotics kill bacteria and what makes the bioterrorism agent ricin so deadly. Close by investigating techniques to create biological drugs on demand. x
    • 32
      Protein-Synthesis Controls and Epigenetics
      Explore the controls that determine which genes are expressed at a given time, where in the body, and to what extent. Controls that act over and above the information in DNA are called epigenetic, and they can be passed on to offspring for a generation or two. Consider the case of honeybees, where a special food affects which genes are expressed, turning an ordinary larva into a queen bee. x
    • 33
      Human Genetic Disease and Gene Therapy
      Roughly 10,000 human diseases may be caused by mutations in single genes. Review the nature of genetic disorders, such as cystic fibrosis, hemophilia, and Alzheimer's. Also examine diseases that emerge from mutations in mitochondrial DNA. Finally, assess the challenges of using gene therapy and other technologies to treat genetic diseases-issues that raise technical, legal, and ethical problems. x
    • 34
      Cancer Mechanisms and Treatments
      Cover the ways that cells become cancerous, notably through a series of unfortunate mutations that lead to uncontrolled cell division. Genetics, environmental factors, infections, and lifestyle can also play a role. Learn why elephants don't get cancer. Then look at approaches to treating cancer, including use of agents that target rapidly dividing cells, whose side effects include hair loss. x
    • 35
      Biotechnology, Stem Cells, Synthetic Biology
      Molecular biology allows scientists and engineers to manipulate the recipes written in our genes. Spotlight some of the developments drawing on these techniques, including cloning, reprogramming cells, harnessing stem cells, and initiatives in synthetic" biology, a new field that lets researchers create genomes that have never before existed, essentially fashioning entirely new life forms." x
    • 36
      Omics: Genomics, Proteomics, Transcriptomics
      Close by surveying exciting developments in molecular biology that are now unfolding. One area has been dubbed omics," based on the explosion of applications due to genomics, which is the decoding of human and other genomes. Thus, we now have "proteomics," "transcriptomics," and other subfields, all exploiting our knowledge of the DNA sequences responsible for specific biochemical pathways." x
  • The Wonders of America's State Parks

    Instructor Joe Yogerst,

    Available Formats: Instant Video, DVD

    In The Wonders of America’s State Parks, join best-selling travel writer Joe Yogerst for a virtual tour of over 100 state wilderness areas stretching from New England to the Alaskan frontier to the Hawaiian Islands. You’ll learn how these parks came into existence, what makes them a special part of America’s story, and how to get the most out of a visit—whether you want historical insights or panoramic views.

    View Lecture List (24)

    In The Wonders of America’s State Parks, join best-selling travel writer Joe Yogerst for a virtual tour of over 100 state wilderness areas stretching from New England to the Alaskan frontier to the Hawaiian Islands. You’ll learn how these parks came into existence, what makes them a special part of America’s story, and how to get the most out of a visit—whether you want historical insights or panoramic views.

    View Lecture List (24)
    24 Lectures  |  The Wonders of America's State Parks
    Lecture Titles (24)
    • 1
      Niagara Falls: America's Oldest State Park
      Start your tour of some of the most breathtaking state parks in the United States with a look at the nation's oldest state park: Niagara Falls in Upstate New York. Established in 1885, this state park is home to three majestic falls-American Falls, Bridal Veil Falls, and Horseshoe Falls-and a rich array of flora and fauna. x
    • 2
      The Pennsylvania Wilds: Wilderness Reborn
      The state parks of north-central Pennsylvania, located within the Pennsylvania Wilds Conversation Landscape Initiative, lure more than 12 million people each year. In this lecture, explore some of the can't-miss features at Cherry Springs State Park, Leonard Harrison State Park, Cook Forest State Park, Sinnemahoning State Park, and more. x
    • 3
      New York's Adirondacks: "Forever Wild"
      Stretching more than 6 million acres of Upstate New York, Adirondack Park boasts over 3,000 lakes and ponds; 30,000 miles of rivers and streams; and 5,500 campsites. From the Great Camps" of the Gilded Age's rich and famous to Lake Placid, learn what makes this large tract of land just as important as the nation's federal reserves." x
    • 4
      Exploring New Hampshire's White Mountains
      Dive into the adventures within the White Mountain National Forest. There's Franconia Notch, home to the legendary (and defunct) rock formation, the Old Man of the Mountain; Crawford Notch State Park, founded the same year the White Mountain National Forest was established; and Bretton Woods, which lies at the base of Mount Washington. x
    • 5
      The Yankee Coast: Plymouth to Montauk
      Drive just an hour and a half from Plymouth to Newport and you can visit every single state park covered in this lecture. Start with the Pilgrim Memorial (America's most famous rock), then journey to the masonry bastion of Fort Adams in Rhode Island, and end up at Montauk Point and Camp Hero State Parks at the far eastern tip of Long Island. x
    • 6
      New Jersey Pineland Legends and Landscapes
      A lurking, devilish crypto-creature. A ghost town from the 19th century. Towering coastal lights and undeveloped barrier islands. These are just a few of the many fascinating aspects of the state parks found inside New Jersey's Pinelands and the famous Jersey Shore, including Wharton State Forest and Island Beach State Park. x
    • 7
      The Tidewater South: America's Birthplace
      Visit a region of Virginia and Maryland where you can experience more than 400 years of American history, including the Jamestown settlement and the battle of Yorktown. In addition, learn about the unspoiled natural wonders you can find at places like Assateague State Park and the Great Dismal Swamp. x
    • 8
      Georgia and Carolina Islands: Lost in Time
      Get up close and personal with barrier island state parks in Georgia, South Carolina, and the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Discover the incredible variety of history, culture, and outdoor adventures waiting for you in spots like Reynolds Mansion State Park, Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site, and Jockey's Ridge State Park. x
    • 9
      Southern Appalachian Peaks and Valleys
      Get a taste of what you can expect from a state park road trip through the southern Appalachians. Mr. Yogerst reveals the scenic jewels you can find within Alabama's DeSoto State Park, northwest Georgia's Fort Mountain, northeast Georgia's Tullulah Gorge (the Grand Canyon of the South"), and South Carolina's Mountain Bridge." x
    • 10
      The Florida Keys: Tropical Paradise Parks
      See what is so special about Florida's state park system-and the archipelago in which they're found. Here, dive into several state parks in the Florida Keys, including John Pennekamp State Park, Bahia Honda State Park, Curry Hammock State Park, and the San Pedro Underwater Archaeological Preserve State Park. x
    • 11
      West Texas: Where the West Is Still Wild
      Visit two awe-inspiring state parks in West Texas: first, Big Bend Ranch, located on the Rio Grande River and home to a vast backcountry you can only explore on unpaved desert roads, and second, Palo Duro Canyon, a 20-mile-wide canyon that offers the best horseback riding in the Texas Panhandle. x
    • 12
      Adventures in the Ozarks and Ouachitas
      What the Ozarks and Ouachitas-two rugged highland areas separated by the Arkansas River Valley-lack in height they more than make up for in the sheer variety of things to do there. Join Mr. Yogerst on an exploration of spots like the Ozark Folk Center State Park, Onondaga Cave State Park, and Lake Ouachita State Park. x
    • 13
      State Parks along the Mighty Mississippi
      The vast majority of natural and human landmarks along the 2,320-mile stretch of the Mississippi River can be found at state parks. Here, take a trip down Old Man River and hop from Itasca State Park in Minnesota through Columbus-Belmont State Park in Kentucky all the way to Rosedown Plantation in Louisiana. x
    • 14
      Presidential Parks in the Land of Lincoln
      Trace the formative years of Abraham Lincoln's life and learn how history and nature shaped one of the nation's most iconic presidents. You'll visit Lincoln Homestead State Park, Lincoln State Park, Lincoln's New Salem State Park, Brown County State Park, and John James Audubon State Park. x
    • 15
      The Great Lakes: Back from the Brink
      In recent years, the state parks in and around the Great Lakes have benefitted from major restoration efforts, making them must-see places to visit. In this lecture, explore Mackinac Island in Michigan, Indiana Dunes State Park near Chicago, South Bass Island State Park in Ohio's Lake Erie Archipelago, and more. x
    • 16
      The Black Hills: Nature and Native Heritage
      Attend a riveting buffalo auction where prices range as high as $5,000 per animal. Explore 71,000 acres of woodland, prairie, lakes, and mountains. Visit the renowned boomtown of Deadwood. These are just a few of the many adventures on offer in the Black Hills of South Dakota-all of which you'll learn about here. x
    • 17
      Parks of the Colorado Front Range
      Despite being one of our national treasures, very little of the Colorado Rockies is protected by the National Park Service. Discover why the best way to explore Colorado's mighty mountains is by visiting amazing state parks from State Forest State Park in the far north to Lincoln Park in the heart of Denver to the dinosaur graveyard at Garden Park Fossil Area. x
    • 18
      Southwest Red Rock and Desert Canyon Parks
      From the strange serenity of Cathedral Rock to flaming red sandstone formations in the Valley of Fire to a basin named for the famous Kodachrome slide film, tour the desert canyon landscapes of the American Southwest. It's a grand loop that takes you through 900 miles of scenery and 200 years of geologic history. x
    • 19
      California's Badlands: Anza-Borrego
      Mr. Yogerst gets a little personal in this lecture on California's Anza-Borrego Desert State Park-which he's been going to his entire life. Explore the melted landscape of the Borrego Badlands, the sandy trails of Coyote Canyon, the majesty of the Salton Sea, and the natural springs of the Vallecito Valley. x
    • 20
      Big Blue: The Beauty of Lake Tahoe
      Lake Tahoe holds the title of the largest alpine lake in North America, and it's a scenic wonder (and recreational treasure) all year round. Spend some time poking around the lake's iconic state parks, including Emerald Bay on the California side and Sand Harbor on the Nevada shore. x
    • 21
      California's Coastal Redwood Parks
      Northern California's coastal redwoods are among the tallest and oldest living things on the planet. Learn what makes coastal redwoods different from their cousins in the Sierra Nevada, what mobilized federal and state efforts to save the redwoods, and the best ways to see them for yourself at Prairie Creek, Del Norte Coast, and Jedediah Smith state parks. x
    • 22
      Washington's Orca Islands: The San Juans
      Want a fascinating glimpse of quirky American history? Look no further than a journey through the state parks of the San Juan Islands. Tour this mosaic of islands and waterways, home to state parks that reflect the archipelago's bucolic lifestyles, including Lime Kiln Point State Park and Matia Island Marine State Park. x
    • 23
      Alaska's State Parks: The Last Frontier
      Sprawling across 1.6 million acres of wilderness, Wood-Tikchik is one of the largest state parks in the United States (around the same size as Delaware). Chugach, on the other hand, is an easily reachable state park just miles from downtown Anchorage. Both parks-and their can't-miss sights-are covered here. x
    • 24
      Hawaii's Primeval Napali Coast
      Hawaii's Napali Coast is a vision of paradise on Earth, with remote beaches, rainforest valleys, 40-story waterfalls, ancient villages, and plenty of wildlife. End this course on a tropical note with a look at spots including Ha'ena State Park, Na Pali Natural Area Reserve, and Waimea Canyon State Park. x
  • Cooking Basics: What Everyone Should Know

    Chef-Instructor Sean Kahlenberg, AOS

    Available Formats: Instant Video, DVD

    Presented in partnership with The Culinary Institute of America and filmed at the CIA’s flagship facility in Hyde Park, New York, Cooking Basics: What Everyone Should Know provides the step-by-step instructions you need to become a confident, productive cook in your own home. Your instructor, Chef Sean Kahlenberg, carefully walks you through the many dozen original recipes he presents in this course in 24 easy-to-follow lessons. Afterward, you’ll serve and enjoy each mouth-watering meal with pride!

    View Lecture List (24)

    Presented in partnership with The Culinary Institute of America and filmed at the CIA’s flagship facility in Hyde Park, New York, Cooking Basics: What Everyone Should Know provides the step-by-step instructions you need to become a confident, productive cook in your own home. Your instructor, Chef Sean Kahlenberg, carefully walks you through the many dozen original recipes he presents in this course in 24 easy-to-follow lessons. Afterward, you’ll serve and enjoy each mouth-watering meal with pride!

    View Lecture List (24)
    24 Lectures  |  Cooking Basics: What Everyone Should Know
    Lecture Titles (24)
    • 1
      Risotto and What to Do with the Leftovers
      Rice is one of the most versatile grains in the world, and this risi e bisi, rice with peas," is one of the most delicious ways to use it. Among other techniques, you'll learn how to keep the chlorophyll from turning black while cooking, how to relax the risotto on the plate for best presentation, and how to make perfect arancini with the leftovers." x
    • 2
      Choosing the Best Method to Cook Vegetables
      Should you peel a vegetable before cooking or not? Cook it in water or oil? Put a lid on the pot or leave it off? Add salt to the water-and if so, why? Chef Kahlenberg answers these questions and more as he begins with kitchen basics. Learn which knives you need in the kitchen and other tools you might need to add. x
    • 3
      An Elegant Corn Soup with Lobster
      In this lesson, you will cook, shave, and milk corn to create a delicious corn soup with julienned vegetables, an accompaniment to freshly cooked lobster. And once the lobster is cooked, you'll learn the correct way to separate it to best access all its sweet meat. x
    • 4
      Sauteed Scallops with Roasted Cauliflower
      As you begin to prepare your scallops, Chef Kahlenberg shares the secret" way chefs decide whether or not this seafood is truly fresh. You'll also learn how to season and baste scallops to perfection. Roasted and pureed cauliflower seasoned with a white mirepoix makes just the right side dish." x
    • 5
      How to Poach an Octopus
      In this lesson, you'll learn a dual-cooking method for preparing octopus-poaching and sauteing-for just the right flavor and consistency, as well as how to cut and plate the octopus. Your meal is completed with fingerling potatoes and a Spanish romesco sauce. x
    • 6
      How to Break Down and Roast a Chicken
      In this lesson, you'll learn how and why to truss a chicken before roasting and the best way to season and oil the bird. Using a chef's thermometer, you'll learn how to manage the Maillard reaction while making sure the interior retains its juices. x
    • 7
      Braising Short Ribs and Making Polenta
      Cooking short ribs takes patience because it takes time to break down the connective tissue in the protein-but the result is well worth it! In this lesson, you will simmer, steam, and braise the meat before plating with cheesy polenta and delicious root vegetables. x
    • 8
      Pork Milanese and the Art of Breading
      Learn how to safely pound pork to create a thin, wide cutlet that will fill almost your entire plate. You'll also learn how to bread the pork with seasoned flour, egg, and breadcrumbs, and how to pan fry it, not deep fry. In addition, you'll make a beautiful salad with suprêmed grapefruit. x
    • 9
      Grilled Salmon: Breaking Down a Round Fish
      Starting with a whole salmon, you'll learn how to check for freshness; create the filets; and remove the ribs, pin bones, skin, and as much bloodline as possible. In addition to finishing the salmon on a grill pan, you'll learn how to parch and cook quinoa for a delicious quinoa pilaf. x
    • 10
      One-Dish Cookery: Coq au Vin
      Coq au vin is a French chicken dish, all made in one pot. You'll learn how to create a 24-hour marinade, braise the chicken while keeping the fond golden-brown, safely add and cook off brandy, and create the perfectly sized cartouche for oven cooking. To accompany the chicken, you'll make a pomme puree and a garnish of onions and mushrooms. x
    • 11
      Monkfish: From Bycatch to Haute Cuisine
      You might think monkfish is an unusual choice for a gourmet meal: It's a bottom-feeder formerly called garbage fish and is considered so ugly" that it's almost never sold with the head on. But with Chef Kahlenberg's instruction, you will turn monkfish to a golden-brown delicacy, accompanied by a whole-grain salad." x
    • 12
      How to Make Rack of Lamb Persillade
      What really brings color to this meal is the bright green persillade that will coat the lamb after it has been seared in a pan and before it goes into the oven. You'll also learn to make a caponata-a warm vegetable salad with eggplant, raisins, capers, and pine nuts-as an accompaniment. A beautiful meal. x
    • 13
      Making Your Own Pasta: Potato Gnocchi
      Gnocchi, sometimes called Italian dumplings, is a pasta made with flour and potatoes. Learn about a few of the 200+ types of potatoes, their range of starch-to-moisture ratios, and which potatoes are best for making gnocchi. You'll learn to mill, cut, and shape this pasta with a gnocchi pallet-and make a delicious sauce to accompany this Mediterranean comfort food. x
    • 14
      Making Your Own Pasta: Butternut Agnolotti
      In this lesson, you'll learn how to determine exactly how much flour and eggs you'll need to measure for pasta. Once the dough is made and rested, you'll learn how to use the pasta roller until the dough is exactly the correct consistency and how to use a piping bag to insert the roasted butternut squash mixture. Delicious! x
    • 15
      Cooking the Perfect Thanksgiving Turkey
      To brine or not to brine? While there are pros and cons to both, in this lesson, you'll learn Chef Kahlenberg's method of brining and cooking turkey, as well as creating delicious stuffing and cranberry sauce. With the chef's tips on prep and cook times, it will all come together exactly as you've always hoped. x
    • 16
      Seafood Delight: How to Make Cioppino
      Cioppino is a Portuguese seafood stew that made its way to San Francisco and is now considered a classic of that area. For this dish, you'll learn how to prepare shrimp, mussels, calamari, clams, halibut, and scallops, as well as cleaning, cutting, and cooking leeks. Grill a baguette to finish and you'll have the perfect seafood meal! x
    • 17
      Finding Your Roots: Maple-Roasted Celeriac
      While vegan menus can be a challenge for any chef, as umami can be difficult to include, Chef Kahlenberg shares his own tricks to address the issue. You'll learn how to clean, peel, and prepare celeriac; clean and prepare a variety of carrots; and how to season, cook, and plate this delicious vegan meal. x
    • 18
      How to Make Great Paella
      Paella is an ancient, summertime, one-pot seafood and rice dish originating near Valencia, updated here to include pork and chicken. In this lesson, you'll learn how to render fat from chorizo to use as a cooking medium, create a sofrito, parch rice, bloom saffron, prepare artichokes-and bring it all together in one special pan for a unique culinary experience. x
    • 19
      Smoking Pork with Mexican Street Corn
      This recipe requires a bit of advanced planning, as the marinated and fully seasoned pork must be smoked for 16 hours. You'll also learn how to prepare corn so it can both steam and grill at the same time for maximum flavor, and to create and dress the perfect Virginia slaw. x
    • 20
      Dover Sole: Breaking Down a Flat Fish
      Dover sole is a flat fish and a bottom-feeder that almost always comes whole with the intestines left in, requiring very different preparation and cooking than a round fish. Chef Kahlenberg demonstrates how to remove the skin by hand, which must be done before cooking. You'll also make perfectly sized fondant potatoes, as well as beautiful asparagus. x
    • 21
      You Too Can Make Ratatouille
      This French vegetable stew is given such a beautiful presentation by Chef Kahlenberg that it almost looks like a work of art! Step by step, you'll learn how to remove the bitterness from eggplant and how to cut all vegetables to the exact same size, including using a ring mold for the red and green peppers. In addition, you'll make a delicious branzino and tapenade. x
    • 22
      Making Roast Beef and Potato Gratin
      Learn how to trim, score, and tie beef before you start cooking to help with flavor and presentation later on. After oven searing, you'll use a chef's thermometer to determine when to remove the meat, resting it with carryover cooking to complete the process. You'll learn to make a delicious potato gratin, as well. x
    • 23
      Patience, Pickles, and Crispy Fried Chicken
      These easy-to-make pickles need to sit in brine for one week before eating, so you'll need to start early on that one! The chicken also requires patience, as you'll prepare your 9-cut, leaving it for 24 hours in brine and then 24 hours in buttermilk. At that point, it will be ready for dredging in spiced flour and fried to a beautiful golden brown. Coleslaw is the perfect way to top off this classic American dish. x
    • 24
      My Big Steak: Executing a Three-Course Meal
      In this lesson, you'll learn how to create a three-course meal and have it all come together with perfect timing. You'll prepare filet mignon from a beef tenderloin, create a spinach salad, a potato salad, and a chocolate tarte with raspberry coulis. Bon appetit! x
  • The Power of Body Language

    Instructor Vanessa Van Edwards,

    Available Formats: Instant Video, DVD

    Join CreativeLive instructor and body language expert Vanessa Van Edwards to learn how to use nonverbal communication to become the most memorable person in any room. In The Power of Body Language, Ms. Van Edwards will show you how to be able to identify exactly what impression your verbal and nonverbal language is giving, and how to make a powerful, positive impact on everyone around you.

    View Lecture List (27)

    Join CreativeLive instructor and body language expert Vanessa Van Edwards to learn how to use nonverbal communication to become the most memorable person in any room. In The Power of Body Language, Ms. Van Edwards will show you how to be able to identify exactly what impression your verbal and nonverbal language is giving, and how to make a powerful, positive impact on everyone around you.

    View Lecture List (27)
    27 Lectures  |  The Power of Body Language
    Lecture Titles (27)
    • 1
      Body Language Quiz and First Impressions
      Body Language Quiz and First Impressions x
    • 2
      Elevator Pitch Clinic
      Elevator Pitch Clinic x
    • 3
      How Body Language Changes Perception
      How Body Language Changes Perception x
    • 4
      Microexpressions: Decoding the Face
      Microexpressions: Decoding the Face x
    • 5
      Microexpressions Continued
      Microexpressions Continued x
    • 6
      Discovering & Addressing Emotional Needs
      Discovering & Addressing Emotional Needs x
    • 7
      Questions & Self-Diagnosis
      Questions & Self-Diagnosis x
    • 8
      How Your Body Reacts
      How Your Body Reacts x
    • 9
      Power Body Language
      Power Body Language x
    • 10
      Lie Detection Challenge
      Lie Detection Challenge x
    • 11
      Perfect Elevator Pitch
      Perfect Elevator Pitch x
    • 12
      Elevator Pitch Mistakes & Fixes
      Elevator Pitch Mistakes & Fixes x
    • 13
      Elevator Pitch Practice & Critique
      Elevator Pitch Practice & Critique x
    • 14
      Networking Body Language Tips
      Networking Body Language Tips x
    • 15
      Increasing Income with Nonverbal Actions
      Increasing Income with Nonverbal Actions x
    • 16
      Nonverbal Sales Pitch
      Nonverbal Sales Pitch x
    • 17
      Reading Their Cues
      Reading Their Cues x
    • 18
      Verbal Mirroring & Sales Mistakes
      Verbal Mirroring & Sales Mistakes x
    • 19
      Human Lie Detection Steps 1-3
      Human Lie Detection Steps 1-3 x
    • 20
      Human Lie Detection Steps 4-5
      Human Lie Detection Steps 4-5 x
    • 21
      Human Lie Detection Steps 6-7
      Human Lie Detection Steps 6-7 x
    • 22
      Putting Your New Skills to the Test
      Putting Your New Skills to the Test x
    • 23
      Your Nonverbal Brand
      Your Nonverbal Brand x
    • 24
      Body Language for Photographers
      Body Language for Photographers x
    • 25
      Body Language Hacks
      Body Language Hacks x
    • 26
      Negotiation Tips
      Negotiation Tips x
    • 27
      Students Pitch with Their New Skills
      Students Pitch with Their New Skills x