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New Releases on Sale
  • Getting Your Legal House in Order

    Professor Sally Hurme, JD

    Available Formats: Instant Video, DVD

    In Getting Your Legal House in Order, author and elder law attorney Sally Balch Hurme gives you a practical, step-by-step foray into your legal affairs. From property rights to wills and trusts to insurance and estate planning, these 18 eye-opening lectures give you everything you need to prepare your finances and your future. Filled with accessible advise, this course should be required viewing for people of any age.

    View Lecture List (18)

    In Getting Your Legal House in Order, author and elder law attorney Sally Balch Hurme gives you a practical, step-by-step foray into your legal affairs. From property rights to wills and trusts to insurance and estate planning, these 18 eye-opening lectures give you everything you need to prepare your finances and your future. Filled with accessible advise, this course should be required viewing for people of any age.

    View Lecture List (18)
    18 Lectures  |  Getting Your Legal House in Order
    Lecture Titles (18)
    • 1
      Get Your Legal Life Together Now!
      Begin your course with a survey of what makes up your legal house, from the ordinary day-to-day documents you already have to estate planning tools and considerations. You’ll quickly learn that “getting your legal house in order” is less daunting than it sounds—and it starts with an inventory you will take in this first lecture. x
    • 2
      Reducing Debt by Reading the Fine Print
      Too often, debt is easy to get into but hard to get out of, which is problematic because not only can debt limit your choices today, but it can also endanger the future for you and your loved ones. Here, you will review the major types of consumer debt, things you should consider before taking on debt, and the relationship between debt and your credit score. x
    • 3
      Protecting Yourself from Identity Theft
      Everyone is a potential target of identity thieves, and the best way to defend yourself is to understand how thieves operate. Whether it's a phony call from the IRS or someone rooting around in your trash for account numbers and passcodes, thieves can be wily. Learn several strategies for defending yourself and your data. x
    • 4
      Knowing Your Property Rights
      Property is central to American law, but as anyone who has run afoul of the local zoning board or a condominium's HOA understands, your name might be on the deed (or lease), but property restrictions are rampant. Explore the many rights, responsibilities, restrictions, and hassles of owning and renting property. x
    • 5
      Deciding Whether a Timeshare Is for You
      The marketing literature paints a lovely picture: an ownership stake in vacation property that will set your family up for years of getaways. Timeshares may be wildly popular, but an inside investigation of the costs shows they don’t always add up to a wise investment. Find out what you need to know before buying—or selling—a timeshare. x
    • 6
      Choosing the Insurance You Need
      Insurance is something you buy with the hope that you'll never have to use it. But if you ever do need it, you certainly want to make sure you are covered. Unpack some of the most common types of insurance and arm yourself with a newfound understanding of policies and coverage. x
    • 7
      Figuring Out Your Retirement Finances
      Making the leap from a regular paycheck in your working years to living off your savings in retirement can be scary, and planning ahead is the best way to take care of yourself. From 401(k)s and IRAs to annuities and defined-benefit pension plans, get to know the financial instruments that will take care of you in your golden years. x
    • 8
      Making the Most of Medicare and Medicaid
      No one has ever been accused of saying Medicare and Medicaid are easy to understand. Like the rest of the American health care system, Medicare and Medicaid are built around confusing concepts such as coverage, deductibles, coinsurance—and even “Medigap insurance.” Learn how to make the most of your medical insurance options in later life. x
    • 9
      Weighing the Benefits of Reverse Mortgages
      For some, a reverse mortgage can be a handy tool in retirement, providing a flow of steady cash backed by property you own. Here, you will find out what exactly a reverse mortgage is, how it works, who might want one, and why you might want to avoid them altogether. x
    • 10
      Comparing Retirement Communities
      Where do you want to live in retirement? From resort-like active 50+ communities to Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRCs), today's seniors have more choices than ever before. Survey the ins and outs of age-specific communities, the continuum of care, and what to watch for when planning your finances. x
    • 11
      Drafting Your Estate Plan
      A will is a central document in your estate plan, a way to distribute property that is not already designated by some other way. Reflect on what a will does, why you might or might not need one, and what happens to your property if you die without one. Also, begin thinking about what you should include in a will. x
    • 12
      Understanding and Using Trusts
      Although you’ve no doubt heard of a “trust,” there is a great deal of confusion and misinformation around the concept. Continue reflecting on your estate plan in this lecture that demystifies what a trust is, why you might need both a will and a trust, what you don’t want to put in a trust, and a few special reasons to set one up. x
    • 13
      Controlling Who Gets Your Property
      How you own what you own can make a big difference when it comes time to settle your estate. Consider the legal theory of property “interests”—or rights of ownership—and how you would like your property divided up. Things get complicated in a hurry when it comes to joint ownership, you’ll want to pay close attention if you have a partial interest in a piece of property. x
    • 14
      Separating Probate Facts from Fiction
      At its most basic, “probate” is a court-monitored procedure that determines the validity of a will, inventories assets, and settles claims on an estate. Think of the court as a referee to a game involving heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, executors, administrators, and other players. Get to know how to make probate as smooth and simple as possible for your family. x
    • 15
      Conveying Your Personal Wishes in Writing
      The process of dividing up property can lead to nasty disputes within a family. Fortunately, you can take two easy steps to head off potential family feuds: Write a letter of instruction for your final wishes and another letter for your personal belongings. From organ donation to the type of funeral you want, a letter can save a lot of heartache. x
    • 16
      Creating a Financial Power of Attorney
      A “power of attorney” is a simple document that gives written authorization to someone to represent you or act on your behalf. As you will learn in this lecture, every adult should have a power of attorney for matters of health and a second power of attorney for matters of finance. See why, and then explore the responsibility of being an agent. x
    • 17
      Caregiving by Contract or Court Order
      Much has been written about caregiving, but in this lecture, you will study two legal aspects of the caregiving relationship: the compensation contract for hiring a caregiver or paying a family member for services and the process of working through legal guardianship. Discover a few legal nuances and why they are important. x
    • 18
      Preparing Medical Advance Directives
      One of the kindest things you can do for your family is spare them the distress of having to face decisions about your health care without knowing your wishes. In this final lecture, delve into advanced care planning (including health care powers of attorney)—what treatments you want, and in what circumstances. As with all the tools you have studied, an advance directive is about peace of mind. x
  • Liberty on Trial in America: Cases That Defined Freedom

    Professor Douglas O. Linder, J.D.

    Available Formats: Instant Video, DVD

    In Liberty on Trial in America: Cases That Defined Freedom, you will learn how liberty increased in our country when individuals sued for freedoms and when cases were brought specifically to test the limits of the Constitution. In 24 fascinating lectures, Professor Douglas O. Linder of the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law takes you behinds the scenes of the trials that recognized many of the liberties we enjoy today.

    View Lecture List (24)

    In Liberty on Trial in America: Cases That Defined Freedom, you will learn how liberty increased in our country when individuals sued for freedoms and when cases were brought specifically to test the limits of the Constitution. In 24 fascinating lectures, Professor Douglas O. Linder of the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law takes you behinds the scenes of the trials that recognized many of the liberties we enjoy today.

    View Lecture List (24)
    24 Lectures  |  Liberty on Trial in America: Cases That Defined Freedom
    Lecture Titles (24)
    • 1
      The Trial of Anne Hutchinson
      There was no toleration of religious dissent in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in the 1600s; you either accepted Puritan orthodoxy, or you could leave. And there certainly was no room for religious argument for a woman! When Anne Hutchinson shared with others her religious ideas and gathered a following, the governor put her on trial for heresy. Explore the trials, defense, and punishment of the woman sometimes called “America’s first feminist.” x
    • 2
      The Trial of John Peter Zenger
      Freedom of speech was not a recognized liberty in the early years of American colonies. Speech critical of the powers that be could land one in legal trouble—even if everyone involved agreed the statements were true. Explore the colonial history of the press freedom, voter suppression, and attempts to influence juries as they all came together to affect the libel trial of John Peter Zenger. Did this landmark freedom of the press case actually set any precedent? x
    • 3
      Two Slave Trials
      The citizens of the newly formed United States could not agree on the overall moral issue of slavery, but they were willing to take up its more narrow legal issues. Gain a greater understanding of the many ways in which the legal system supported the institution of slavery by examining the trials of two slaves: Anthony Burns, whose freedom was eventually purchased by abolitionists, and Celia (no last name), who was hanged. x
    • 4
      The Trial of John Brown
      John Brown was an abolitionist who believed he could end slavery by arming the slaves. His plan, however, came to a tragic end at Harper's Ferry, VA, when guards were killed as he seized the federal armory and only a few slaves joined his revolt. Instead, Brown was charged with treason, murder, and slave insurrection. Learn how John Brown's trial and execution nevertheless played a significant role in the eventual end of slavery in the United States. x
    • 5
      The Trial of Susan B. Anthony
      Susan B. Anthony believed she was a citizen of the United States according to the Fourteenth Amendment—and, as such, she believed she had the right to vote. But in 1872, the law was not on her side. So when she dropped her ballot into the box at the West End New Depot in Rochester, NY, on Election Day, she was arrested. Learn about the trial that brought nationwide attention to the issue of women’s suffrage. x
    • 6
      The Trial of the Haymarket Eight
      Labor tensions were already at the boiling point in Chicago, when someone threw a bomb into a group of police officers. Although the bomb thrower was never found, eight defendants were tried by a jury handpicked by the bailiff, and seven were found guilty and sentenced to death—for the crime, it was claimed, of inciting violence. Explore the ways in which this trial became a key event in the history of free speech in America. x
    • 7
      The Trial of John T. Scopes
      In 1925, Tennessee enacted a law making the teaching of evolution in any state-supported school a crime. John Scopes was a young science teacher at the time who agreed to serve as a test case for the law, defended by Clarence Darrow. Explore the heated opinions expressed on both sides and how the trial's publicity brought the issue directly into American homes. x
    • 8
      The Sweet Trials, Race, and Self-Defense
      In 1925, Dr. Ossian Sweet, an African American, bought a home for his family in a white neighborhood of Detroit. When a white crowd gathered around the house and violence broke out, one member of the crowd was killed. Police charged everyone in the Sweet home with premeditated murder. Explore Clarence Darrow's defense, and what the trial revealed about American society at that time. x
    • 9
      Jehovah's Witnesses and Flag-Salute Cases
      Between 1938 and 1946, the Supreme Court handed down 23 opinions involving civil liberties issues raised by Jehovah's Witnesses. Explore two of those cases, both of which address whether or not Jehovah's Witnesses can be forced to salute the flag and recite the Pledge of Allegiance in public schools. Learn why the Court came down first on one side of the issue, and then the other. x
    • 10
      Korematsu v. United States
      In 1942, two months after Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt signed an executive order requiring that all Japanese Americans move to “relocation camps” as a matter of national security. Fred Korematsu refused, was arrested for violating an “exclusion order,” and convicted. Learn how Korematsu carried his fight against what he thought was an “un-American” law all the way to the Supreme Court, and why the decision ultimately went against him. How did history and subsequent Courts treat this decision? x
    • 11
      Segregation on Trial
      In 1892, the Supreme Court, in a case involving the conviction of Homer Plessy for sitting in a section of a Louisiana train designated for “whites only,” established the principle of “separate but equal.” Learn about Charles H. Houston, the African American lawyer who made it his life’s work to challenge Jim Crow laws and who won a critical Supreme Court victory in the case of Gaines v. Missouri, paving the way for the Court’s landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education. Houston’s work for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) to end segregation led his successor, Thurgood Marshall, to say he was just carrying Houston’s bags—and that Houston was the Moses who charted the legal path to racial equality. x
    • 12
      The Lenny Bruce Trials
      Today, Lenny Bruce is considered a trailblazer of American stand-up comedy addressing the now-common themes of politics, sex, and religion. But in the 1950s and '60s, he was considered an obscene subversive, and arrested numerous times. Explore the ways in which Bruce and the First Amendment affected each other. Today's authors, publishers, poets, and comedians owe a debt of gratitude to Bruce. x
    • 13
      The Evolving Right to Marry
      Richard Loving wanted to do nothing more than to marry the woman of his dreams. But Richard was white, and Mildred, according to the commonwealth of Virginia, was “colored,” which made it illegal for them to marry. Learn how the case of this modest, unassuming couple went all the way to the Supreme Court, and how the Court’s ruling eventually led to marriage equality for same-sex couples, as well. x
    • 14
      Wisconsin v. Yoder
      In the 1960s, the Amish had several disagreements with the state concerning their children's education. But most important, they did not believe their children should be required to attend school past the age of 16. Explore the conflicting views and goals of these parents, schools, and state. Learn how the issue made it to the Supreme Court, which conflicting liberties were considered, and why the Court decided in favor of the parents. x
    • 15
      Furman v. Georgia
      Public support for the death penalty in the United States has historically ebbed and flowed. In 1972, when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that capital punishment as then administered was unconstitutional, many legal experts—including some justices—believed that would end the death penalty. Learn why that was not the case, and explore the deep complexities of the law as it relates to capital punishment. x
    • 16
      The Trial of Daniel Ellsberg
      Is it legal for an individual to copy top-secret documents and release them to the press? Is it legal for agents of the government to break into a psychiatrist’s office to look for information about a criminal defendant? Can the government legally stop a newspaper from publishing classified material? Explore how these questions—and their answers from the courts—affected the country’s political life during the Nixon administration, and ultimately led to the president’s resignation. x
    • 17
      The Road to Roe v. Wade
      Norma McCorvey knew two things: She was pregnant and she did not want the baby. Desperate for an abortion, she agreed (under the name “Jane Roe”) to take the case to court, and ultimately the Supreme Court. As you learn about the famous decision that resulted, you’ll also gain a better understanding of the many other ways in which American courts have intervened in personal decisions related to sterilization and birth control, as well as abortion. x
    • 18
      The Right to an Intimate Life
      Should the government interfere in activities in your bedroom? Well into the 20th century, every state had laws prohibiting at least one sexual act, even between heterosexual married couples in the privacy of their own home. Explore the numerous lawsuits and trials that eventually extended the protection of privacy to include intimacy, regardless of sexual orientation. x
    • 19
      The Ruby Ridge Trial
      Do we Americans have the freedom to isolate ourselves, hold and express views considered racist and hateful by the majority, and stockpile legally purchased weapons? Do we have the liberty to sell a sawed-off shotgun? Explore the complex story and resultant trial that started with Randy and Vicki Weaver wanting to separate themselves from mainstream society, and ended with three dead at Ruby Ridge. x
    • 20
      The Trials of Jack Kevorkian
      Jack Kevorkian believed strongly that individuals should have the right to end their pain and suffering, and with his inventions of the “thanotron” and the “mercitron,” Kevorkian helped hundreds do just that. Legally tried, having escaped conviction time after time, a final trial proved his undoing. Explore Dr. Kevorkian’s work on behalf of an individual’s right to euthanasia, why he believed he was taking a stand for liberty, and why he was eventually convicted of second-degree homicide. x
    • 21
      Boy Scouts of America v. Dale
      Do private organizations have the right to exclude members based on criteria that many—maybe even most in society—find objectionable? When the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) expelled scout leader James Dale because he way gay, Dale challenged the BSA’s authority to use sexual orientation as a basis for exclusion. In a case pitting Dale’s claimed right to be free from discrimination against the associational rights of the Scouts, the Supreme Court sided with the Boy Scouts. Examine why the U.S. Supreme Court decided as it did, and the effects and implications of its ruling. x
    • 22
      Kelo v. City of New London
      Does a city have the right to use eminent domain to take private property and sell it for private development if the city believes that development will improve the city’s economy? Learn how Susette Kelo’s refusal to sell her “little pink house” in New London, CT, led to a Supreme Court case addressing what she described to Congress as “eminent domain abuse”—and why she lost the case. x
    • 23
      The Citizens United Case
      U.S. candidates have a long history of trying to outraise and outspend their opponents to win elections. This has meant, oftentimes, that big corporations and wealthy donors determine election outcomes and, at least potentially, gain an opportunity to influence the votes and policies of the candidates they helped elect. In response, Congress had repeatedly tried to curtail such “corrupting” activities. Explore why, then, in 2010, the Supreme Court declared any ban on political spending by corporations to be unconstitutional—and why, at the same time, most polls show strong support for a constitutional amendment to overturn the ruling. x
    • 24
      Liberty for Nonhumans?
      Many Americans were initially excluded from “liberty and justice for all.” Is it possible that future trials will result in greater liberties for apes, cetaceans, and elephants? Learn how “Tommy” became the first chimpanzee to have a suit for his freedom filed on his behalf and why one judge on the New York Court of Appeals says the issue of fundamental rights for nonhuman animals is not going away. x
  • A Historian Goes to the Movies: Ancient Rome

    Professor Gregory S. Aldrete, Ph.D.

    Available Formats: Instant Video, DVD

    From Ben-Hur to Spartacus to Gladiator, get a front-row look at the great movies that have shaped ancient Rome’s role in popular culture and memory. The 12 lectures of Professor Gregory S. Aldrete’s A Historian Goes to the Movies: Ancient Rome cover over 50 years of cinematic history and talent, and immerse you in the glory and grandeur—and even the folly—of classic and contemporary films set in Roman antiquity.

    View Lecture List (12)

    From Ben-Hur to Spartacus to Gladiator, get a front-row look at the great movies that have shaped ancient Rome’s role in popular culture and memory. The 12 lectures of Professor Gregory S. Aldrete’s A Historian Goes to the Movies: Ancient Rome cover over 50 years of cinematic history and talent, and immerse you in the glory and grandeur—and even the folly—of classic and contemporary films set in Roman antiquity.

    View Lecture List (12)
    12 Lectures  |  A Historian Goes to the Movies: Ancient Rome
    Lecture Titles (12)
    • 1
      Quo Vadis Kick-Starts the Sword-and-Sandal Genre
      Few films did as much to shape the modern movie-going public’s notions of ancient Rome as Quo Vadis. Discover how this film, released in 1951 by MGM Studios, ushered in the golden age of the so-called “sword-and-sandal” picture, with its irresistible formula of evil, arrogant Romans versus virtuous, devout Christians. x
    • 2
      Ben-Hur: The Greatest Chariot Race
      Ben-Hur, from 1959, was an enormous financial risk that nevertheless became a cash machine for MGM Studios. In this lecture, unpack the intricate tensions between the Jewish prince Judah Ben-Hur and the Roman aristocrat Messala, then analyze the historical accuracies (and inaccuracies) of the film's iconic naval battle and chariot race sequences. x
    • 3
      Spartacus: Kubrick's Controversial Epic
      Discover what makes Spartacus—despite being one of the best-known cinema epics of ancient Rome—something of an oddity. It’s a gladiator film with only one scene of combat. Its production was rife with conflict. Its narrative misrepresents the real-life Spartacus’s goals. And it played an important role in Joseph McCarthy’s anti-communist movement. x
    • 4
      Cleopatra: Spectacle Gone Wild
      How did the 1963 film, Cleopatra, bring about the destruction of the golden age of epic films set in ancient Rome—and destroy the old Hollywood studio system? How does this film treat the historical accounts of figures like Julius Caesar, Mark Antony, and Octavian? Why do its grand costumes and sets still deserve admiration? x
    • 5
      The Fall of the Roman Empire and Ancient Epics
      With its $19 million price tag and its $4.75 million in returns, The Fall of the Roman Empire was an unmitigated financial disaster. From its connections to 1960s global politics to its elaborate reconstruction of the Roman Forum to its bleak ending, explore why some critics and scholars regard this as a sophisticated take on ancient Rome. x
    • 6
      I, Claudius: The BBC Makes an Anti-Epic
      Consider the 1976 BBC production of I, Claudius, which has been credited as one of the most influential and memorable portraits of the ancient world ever to appear on the screen—big or small. Set between 24 B.C. and A.D. 54, the miniseries created an intimate look at the reigns of emperors Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula, and Claudius. x
    • 7
      Life of Brian: The Roman World's a Funny Place
      What would a parody of sword-and-sandal films, with all their genre conventions and clichés, look like? Discover how Monty Python’s Life of Brian, a witty parody of both biblical and Roman epic films, took on gladiatorial games, ancient Roman society and religion, and the human tendency toward factionalism and tribalism. x
    • 8
      Gladiator: The Historical Epic Revived
      Why did big-budget epics of the ancient world fall out of fashion? How did the 2000 film, Gladiator, single-handedly resuscitate a genre that had been dormant for nearly 40 years? What has recent scholarship revealed about the film’s portrayals of gladiator battles and the lives of ancient Roman emperors—their truths, falsehoods, and embellishments? x
    • 9
      Rome: HBO's Gritty Take on Ancient History
      To get a sense of what living in ancient Rome was really like for the average person, the best place to look is the HBO miniseries, Rome. Learn how, despite its flaws, this short-lived series offers accurate (if gritty) views of different religious beliefs, the role of slavery in ancient Roman society, and more. x
    • 10
      Centurion and The Eagle: The Legions in Britain
      Explore two films that take on the legendary story of an ancient Roman legion lost in the mists of Britain. Both Centurion and The Eagle, while not as well-known as some of the other films featured in this course, nevertheless, offer solid insights into Roman military tactics and raise central issues about Roman imperialism. x
    • 11
      Scipione l'africano and Fellini Satyricon
      While both were Italian productions, Scipione l’africano and Fellini Satyricon couldn’t be more dissimilar in style. Examine how these two films—one a pompous work of propaganda from 1937, the other a subversive piece of overindulgence from 1969—are best seen as products of the eras in which they were made. x
    • 12
      Bread and Circuses in Sci-Fi Films
      The Hunger Games, The Matrix, The Running Man, Rollerball, Ready Player One—each of these wildly different sci-fi films derive their premise from a line of poetry by the ancient Roman satirist Juvenal. How has a simple motif about “bread and circuses” powered some of the most memorable sci-fi plots in cinema? x
  • Fighting Misinformation: Digital Media Literacy

    Taught By Multiple Professors

    Available Formats: Instant Video, DVD

    The International Research & Exchanges Board (IREX) has teamed up with The Great Courses to provide an outstanding eight-lecture series designed to arm you with the very skills needed to defuse the threat of misinformation media. Ms.Tara Susman-Peña, a senior technical advisor, and her colleagues at IREX, Mehri Druckman and Nina Odura, will lead you step by step through the history, evolution, science, and impact of misinformation in Fighting Misinformation: Digital Media Literacy, an eight-lecture course that helps you to develop the skills you need to combat fakes, stereotypes, and frauds within every kind of media source.

    View Lecture List (8)

    The International Research & Exchanges Board (IREX) has teamed up with The Great Courses to provide an outstanding eight-lecture series designed to arm you with the very skills needed to defuse the threat of misinformation media. Ms.Tara Susman-Peña, a senior technical advisor, and her colleagues at IREX, Mehri Druckman and Nina Odura, will lead you step by step through the history, evolution, science, and impact of misinformation in Fighting Misinformation: Digital Media Literacy, an eight-lecture course that helps you to develop the skills you need to combat fakes, stereotypes, and frauds within every kind of media source.

    View Lecture List (8)
    8 Lectures  |  Fighting Misinformation: Digital Media Literacy
    Lecture Titles (8)
    • 1
      The Misinformation Threat
      Democracy depends on a well-informed, discerning electorate, equipped to judge the validity of the information available. In this first lecture, Ms. Susman-Peña and her esteemed colleagues at IREX delve into the concepts of misinformation and disinformation, and explain the critical ways in which falsehoods, slander, prejudice, and bad ideas can threaten American democracy. x
    • 2
      The Evolution of Media and Misinformation
      Options for news sources have expanded exponentially in the digital age. Content is at our fingertips from traditional news sources, but anyone can now be a publisher of information on the internet, and computer algorithms are influencing what you see every day. How do we sort the legitimate news from false, misleading, or opinion content? Travel with your instructors through the history of communication technology as you learn how to separate the wheat from the chaff. x
    • 3
      Misinformation and the Brain
      Humans often fail to critically evaluate the world around us. Take a close look at the machinations of misinformation, and how it can be used in conjunction with our natural cognitive biases to lead us astray. Learn about the role of reality distortion, the “Barnum effect,” selective recall, and confirmation bias in misinformation, and how techniques like “Label to Disable” and “Care before You Share” can help. x
    • 4
      Seeing through Visual Misinformation
      Visual images have been selected, edited, reframed—even manipulated—before they reach us, often in ways designed to elicit an emotional response. Explore the impact of reuse and mislabeling, photo selection effect, and deliberate alteration or forgery to affect how we see and feel about an image. Then, employ Label to Disable to diffuse the threat of visual misinformation. x
    • 5
      Countering Fakes and Stereotypes in Media
      How do fake information and stereotypes combine to produce an especially damaging type of misinformation? Fake information, including fake social media accounts, fake chat messages, and fake reviews, can infiltrate our electronic lives. See how stereotypes can magnify the damage done by fake information, and consider the difficult questions presented by the human tendency toward bias. x
    • 6
      Journalistic Verification Skills
      Your ability to differentiate between fact and opinion and to judge the quality of media content is vital to a functional democracy. You do not have to go it alone. Learn how the professionals test and verify information, as well as what websites, plug-ins, and tactics can help you determine journalistic integrity and accuracy of information. x
    • 7
      Assessing Science and Health News
      How can we make good decisions about important health and science issues if we cannot trust the news we get about them? Scientific knowledge, by its very nature, is always changing, but using some simple methods described in this segment, you can ascertain the validity of health and science information. x
    • 8
      Technology, Misinformation, and the Future
      The rise of new technology has led to a simultaneous, exponential increase in misinformation—locally, nationally, and even internationally. Learn how artificial intelligence and augmented reality programs are being used to spread misinformation, and how media literacy, Label to Disable, and Care before You Share can be used to combat its spread. x
  • Going to the Devil: The Impeachment of 1868
    Available Formats: Instant Video, DVD

    The Great Courses is proud to present Going to the Devil: The Impeachment of 1868 This first-time-ever original narrative documentary is a unique and entertaining retelling of the turbulent yet fascinating events leading up to and through the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson. You’ll hear “first-hand” from the characters themselves—including Thaddeus Stevens, Charles Sumner, and others who were involved—as you get an in-depth and evenhanded view of an often-overlooked period in American history. And these characters are probably unlike anyone you have encountered. With back-stabbings, acts of violence, twists and turns, and a cult of personalities, the factual history of this case unfolds like a fictional story.

    View Lecture List (1)

    The Great Courses is proud to present Going to the Devil: The Impeachment of 1868 This first-time-ever original narrative documentary is a unique and entertaining retelling of the turbulent yet fascinating events leading up to and through the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson. You’ll hear “first-hand” from the characters themselves—including Thaddeus Stevens, Charles Sumner, and others who were involved—as you get an in-depth and evenhanded view of an often-overlooked period in American history. And these characters are probably unlike anyone you have encountered. With back-stabbings, acts of violence, twists and turns, and a cult of personalities, the factual history of this case unfolds like a fictional story.

    View Lecture List (1)
    1 Lectures  |  Going to the Devil: The Impeachment of 1868
    Lecture Titles (1)
    • 1
      Going to the Devil: The Impeachment of 1868
      Experience a dramatic, often-overlooked period of American history with this unique narrative documentary that delves into the story of the first impeachment. x