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  • The History of Spain: Land on a Crossroad

    Professor Joyce E. Salisbury, Ph.D.

    Available Formats: Video Download, Audio Download, DVD, CD

    Spain has played a unique and pivotal role in Western civilization. In this course, you’ll learn its epic history, from its rule under Rome and the breathtaking drama of Islamic Spain to its emergence into the modern world, as well as its phenomenal contributions to art, architecture, literature, music, and learning. Travel with us to this remarkable culture, and savor the great human drama of the story of Spain.

    View Lecture List (24)
    24 Lectures  |  The History of Spain: Land on a Crossroad
    Lecture Titles (24)
    • 1
      From Stones to Bronze: Prehistoric Spain
      Begin by exploring the origins of human settlement on the Iberian Peninsula. Learn how the rich spiritual life of early hunter/gatherers in Spain is reflected in magnificent cave paintings. Study the geography of the peninsula, and how it drew peoples from Africa and the Middle East. Finally, discover the extraordinary megalithic tombs of early Copper and Bronze Age builders. x
    • 2
      Celtic, Phoenician, and Greek Colonists
      Follow three remarkable immigrant groups who left their mark on Spanish culture. First, trace the impact of the Celts and the technology they brought to the region. Learn about the Phoenicians, famous as mariners, and their legacy of trade and engineering. Continue with the singular influence of the Greeks, who shaped the history and culture of the peninsula for future immigrants. x
    • 3
      Rome Conquers the Iberian Peninsula
      Roman conquest changed the peninsula in ways that endure today. Track the Punic Wars between Rome and Carthage, through which Iberia became part of the Roman Empire. Observe how Rome joined the Iberian provinces together, created thriving cities, and developed commerce. Learn about the marvels of Roman engineering, infrastructure, and mining, through which Spain grew rich. x
    • 4
      Christianity Comes to Hispania
      Witness the events through which Christianity took root on Spanish soil. Learn about early Christian communities in Spain, and the factors that led to persecution and martyrdom of Christians. Chart the role of Spanish churchmen in the establishment of the Roman Catholic Church, how pagan practices were transformed into Christian ones, and how Spain became a bulwark of church orthodoxy. x
    • 5
      Barbarian Tribes Divide the Peninsula
      As Rome's empire waned, Germanic and Iranian tribal groups besieged Spanish territories. Take the measure of these peoples, and the new agricultural technology, clothing, and other innovations they brought with them. Observe how they partitioned and ruled different areas of the peninsula, and how their culture and religion kept them separate from Spain's Roman population. x
    • 6
      The Visigoths Unite Spain
      As a prelude to the three-century rule of the Visigoths, learn how the Goths penetrated Roman territories, and how they came to dominate Spain. Study the structure of Visigoth society, which gave rise to influential legal codes, monasticism, and great scholars such as Isidore of Seville. Take account of Toledo as a center of learning, and the diffusion of Visigothic scholarship and culture. x
    • 7
      Islam: The New Religion
      Islam was to play a critical role in Spanish history. As background, delve into the founding of Islam by Muhammad, its five tenets or “pillars”, and how the new religion spread with astonishing speed. Witness the Muslim invasion that conquered most of Spain, and observe how the invaders ruled, coexisting effectively with Jews and Christians. x
    • 8
      Conflict within Islam
      Internal divisions in the Muslim world shaped Islamic rule of Spain. Investigate issues concerning the larger governance of Islam that led to enmity between Muslim Spain and the Caliphate in Bagdad. Study the role of the Frankish king Charlemagne in these conflicts, and trace conspiracies and rebellions within Muslim Spain that culminated in the establishment of the Caliphate of Cordoba. x
    • 9
      The Moors and the Glory of al-Andalus
      Relive the golden age of Islamic Spain, as the capital city of Cordoba emerged as a center of learning, art, and beauty. First, take account of the agricultural advancements and artisanal industries that underlay Cordoba's prosperity. Then, follow developments in music, poetry, intellectual life, science, engineering, and architecture that made al-Andalus famous throughout the world. x
    • 10
      The Christian Reconquista
      This lecture charts the centuries-long process by which Christians gradually reclaimed the lands of Islamic Spain. Learn how pilgrimage to the shrine of Santiago de Compostela became a catalyst for the Christian cause. Explore four critical events in the Reconquista: the conquest of Toledo, the taking of Valencia by “El Cid”, the creation of Portugal, and the final conquest of Granada. x
    • 11
      Medieval Spanish Culture
      Discover how the melding of Spanish Islamic culture and medieval Christian ideas produced dazzling masterpieces of architecture. Travel to the times of king Alfonso the Wise, whose rich court life fostered scholarship and medicine, as well as courtly entertainments such as music, sports, and bullfighting. Learn about the flourishing of trade, highlighting the complex wool and textile industry. x
    • 12
      The Sephardim: Iberian Judaism
      Follow the changing fortunes of the Jewish people on Spanish soil, beginning with how they arrived in Spain, and how they prospered under Roman rule. Trace repression of Jews under the Visigoths, and how Jewish scholarship and poetic art thrived in Muslim Spain. Then witness the trials of Jews under subsequent Christian rule, leading to the 15th century exodus of many Jews from Spain. x
    • 13
      Gypsy Influences on Spain
      Gypsy immigrants to Spain left a far-reaching imprint on Spanish culture. Here, uncover the origins of gypsy peoples, their itinerant nature, and note how they were originally welcomed by Spanish kings and nobles. Study subsequent oppression of gypsies, the nature of gypsy culture, and the iconic flamenco music and dance that is deeply linked with Spanish gypsies. x
    • 14
      The Growth of Catholic Religious Passion
      Grasp how Spain was brought into the conflict of the Protestant Reformation. Assess the Catholic Counter-Reformation, as it sought to connect the faithful more directly to God through reinvigorated spirituality and mysticism. Learn how the Council of Trent, codifying Catholic doctrine, led to the horrors of the Inquisition, and how Catholic theology was expressed in glorious Baroque art. x
    • 15
      Columbus and the New World
      European contact with the isolated Americas dramatically changed the world. Begin by delving into the self-education of Columbus, and the lead-up to his legendary voyages. Follow Columbus’s travels, and the impact of his “opening” of the New World. Finally, track further European ventures into the Americas, the Columbian Exchange of foodstuffs, and the devastation wrought by European diseases. x
    • 16
      Conquistadors and Missionaries
      Spain now extended both its empire and its Catholicism into the New World. Witness the exploits of Hernán Cortés, who battled the Aztec Empire in the quest for gold, and of Francisco Pizarro and his brutal subjugation of the Incas. Then, take account of the Catholic missionaries who followed, intent on converting native souls, and how Spanish empire building was undergirded by slavery. x
    • 17
      The Spanish Main: Trade Convoys and Piracy
      Spain's empire in the New World spawned a vast commercial revolution. Learn about Spanish silver mining in South America, and agricultural riches from giant haciendas producing sugar and tobacco. Follow the transport of Spanish goods in armed convoys, and the resulting golden age of piracy, as both pirates and government-sanctioned privateers preyed on treasure-laden ships. x
    • 18
      The Golden Age of the Spanish Habsburgs
      Here, encounter Spain's king Philip II, architect of a magnificent era. Observe his strategic moving of the royal capital to Madrid, and his creation of architectural works such as the fabulous El Escorial. Learn how Philip and his sons fostered an artistic heritage emblemized by visionaries such as the painter Velasquez, composers de Victoria and Guererro, and writers Lope de Vega and Cervantes. x
    • 19
      Religious Wars on Muslims and Protestants
      Now witness the Ottoman incursions against Christian lands and shipping that resulted in the massive naval battle of Lepanto. Then, see how the clash with Protestants involved Spain in religious bloodshed in the Netherlands, the assault on Britain of the Spanish Armada, and the Thirty Years War. Note how the ruinous costs of these wars prefigured the downfall of the Habsburg Dynasty. x
    • 20
      The 18th-Century Bourbon Kings of Spain
      Learn how the French House of Bourbon assumed the Spanish throne, and how they transformed Habsburg Spain. In particular, review the reforms instituted by Carlos III, highlighting his architectural and urban planning achievements, and his reforms of education, industry, banking, and religion. Then trace the effects on Spain of the French Revolution and the ascension of Napoleon. x
    • 21
      Spain Loses Its Empire
      Follow Napoleon’s crusade to impose a new French dynasty on Spain, and the cultural backlash of Romanticism that rejected the “universal” principles of the Enlightenment. Witness the emergence of Spanish nationalism, the ensuing deep political strife regarding how to govern the country, and see how the spread of nationalist ideologies culminated in the independence of Spain’s colonies. x
    • 22
      20th-Century Spanish Modernism
      Following World War I, Spain emerged at the forefront of a revolution in the European arts. Grasp the extraordinary innovations of the painters Picasso, Miró and Dalí, the architect Antoni Gaudí, and the contributions of musical masters Segovia and Casals. Also, delve into the political factors that led to the disintegration of Spain’s constitutional monarchy. x
    • 23
      The Spanish Civil War and Franco's Reign
      Study the political antagonisms within Spain which led to the outbreak of civil war in 1936. Track the unfolding of the war, leading to the ascension to power of the dictator Francisco Franco. Then take account of Franco's lengthy, authoritarian regime, and how he strove to create a national identity for Spain through the mediums of the church, language, and Spanish culture. x
    • 24
      Modern Spain: Still on a Crossroad
      Conclude with reflections on Spain's recent history. Look into such subjects as the restoration of the Spanish monarchy, Spain's contemporary links with Latin America, separatist movements within the country, its new secularism and religious freedoms, its popularity as a travel destination, and its diverse economy. Contemplate why this great land stands on a crossroads of the future. x
  • Boosting Your Emotional Intelligence

    Professor Jason M. Satterfield, Ph.D.

    Available Formats: Video Download, Audio Download, DVD, CD

    In Boosting Your Emotional Intelligence, Dr. Jason Satterfield teaches how to identify, monitor, and regulate your own emotions—instead of letting your emotions run the show—and how to manage emotions in others. With the skills you learn from this exciting interactive course, you will be able to improve your emotional intelligence (EQ) now and throughout your life. You’ll be able to use your emotions as you want, to help reach your own personal goals.

    View Lecture List (24)
    24 Lectures  |  Boosting Your Emotional Intelligence
    Lecture Titles (24)
    • 1
      What Is Emotional Intelligence (EQ)?
      Learn about the relatively recent emergence of emotional intelligence as a unique field of inquiry and the three leading theories used to describe and understand EQ. With your emotion journal, you'll start building your EQ Skills Tracker, a running library of what you learn in this course about your own emotions and a to-do list for future learning. x
    • 2
      Measuring EQ
      Measuring your IQ is straightforward, and the standardization of scores on the overall test and subtests are well established. But quantifying your EQ is a much newer and more complex endeavor. How can you measure your EQ and what will those results really tell you? Learn about the four most highly regarded EQ assessment tools and how they each rate with respect to validity and reliability. x
    • 3
      Exploring Emotions
      Although you’ve experienced emotions every day of your life, learning to manage them requires an understanding of how emotions are generated. Learn about the steps in this process and resulting feedback cycles as described in the Modal Model of Emotions. Does this model explain your “good” and “bad” emotions? You’ll be surprised. x
    • 4
      Embodied Emotions
      Do your emotions affect your physical body or do changes in your physical body cause your emotions? Learn which parts of your central and peripheral nervous systems contribute to the experiences we recognize as emotions. But if we really want to improve our EQ, we must also look at our cognition. x
    • 5
      Emotional Impacts
      You probably already realize that your EQ affects your most intimate relationships—your ability to choose appropriate partners and develop long-term satisfying and productive relationships. But the impact of your EQ doesn’t stop there. Learn how your emotions affect every aspect of your life, including your professional and social relationships, cognition, decision-making, and physical health. x
    • 6
      Perceiving and Expressing Emotions
      When speaking to someone in person, you pick up clues as to that individual's emotional state from the words used, the tone of voice, posture, and facial expressions. But what about self-perception? How good are you at perceiving and identifying your own emotions? Learn the EQ skills that can help you improve your understanding of yourself. x
    • 7
      Understanding Emotions
      What are the primary emotions and their associated thoughts and behaviors—emotions found across all cultures, languages, and income and educational levels? Learn how to perceive and correctly identify emotions and their triggers, and to explore the complex relationships between emotions we classify as positive and negative. x
    • 8
      Managing Your Emotions
      All of us have felt at times that our emotions were in charge and we were just helplessly along for the ride. Maybe we've hyper-reacted from a place of anger and fear. Or we've made poor and long-lasting decisions while riding a wave of euphoria. It doesn't have to be that way. Learn about antecedent-focused and response-focused emotion regulation strategies and how to employ them for your own benefit. x
    • 9
      Managing Others' Emotions
      As the famous joke goes, no one has ever become calm because another person ordered them to “Calm down!” But are there real ways we can influence another person’s emotions and consequent behaviors? Although we can never access anyone else’s cognition, the EQ skills we use in our communication and interaction with others can be powerfully influential. x
    • 10
      The Development of EQ
      Research has shown that while genetic makeup does play a role in our EQ, it also is significantly impacted by how we were parented and socialized as a young child. But even if childhood was not ideal and our parents modeled very poor EQ skills, see how it is always possible to improve EQ now through purposeful training. x
    • 11
      Emotional Intelligence Training
      Social-Emotional Learning (SEL) is now taught in more than 30,000 schools across the U.S. because research has revealed a close relationship between emotions and learning. However, “a close relationship” is not the same as cause and effect. Explore several of the most popular SEL programs and their goals and strengths—and learn why outcomes are so difficult to measure. x
    • 12
      Social Intelligence
      We've all been in certain social situations we wish we could just forget: that awkward first date, the floundering job interview, the performance review that took us completely by surprise. Learn how to use your EQ to improve your social intelligence and strengthen social relationships in every aspect of your life. x
    • 13
      Intimacy and EQ
      The quality of your baby-caregiver relationship does affect your EQ skills and later relationships. But regardless of previous attachment styles, EQ training can teach you how to successfully express and perceive emotions—two necessary skills for successful adult intimate relationships. Learn how to understand your “habits of heart” and make appropriate adjustments to meet your goals. x
    • 14
      Interpersonal Conflict
      We are all aware that conflict exists between individuals or distinct social groups that see each other as “different.” Conflict is part of life, and groups of people are always going to disagree on some issues. But emotional and social intelligence skills can help us find common ground, address, and even solve many of our personal and community issues. x
    • 15
      EQ in the Workplace
      EQ skills can have a positive impact in any group of people working together toward a common goal. In addition to helping personal interaction among workplace teams, EQ skills have been shown to facilitate creativity, excitement, and enthusiasm in employees and leadership alike. x
    • 16
      Occupational Stress and Burnout
      Since 1995, work stress in the U.S. has increased 300 percent, with the most significant issues being depersonalization and disconnection. In many cases the use of EQ skills such as somatic quieting and improved concentration and focus can help. But could “love” be the newest way to lessen workplace stress? x
    • 17
      Leadership and EQ
      While companies spent $31 billion on leadership-training programs in just one recent year, more than 60 percent of respondents to the Global Human Capital Survey reported that such programs yielded only “some” value at best. Learn how EQ skills training is helping many business leaders better accomplish their long-term goals. x
    • 18
      Workplace Culture
      Being aware of EQ skills in all aspects of workplace culture can lead to greater workforce engagement with employees who feel seen, heard, and valued. But actively managing workforce culture isn’t just a “feel good” for employees. Explore why companies that proactively manage their culture experience average 10-year revenue growth 516 percent higher than those who do not. x
    • 19
      Stress Management
      Learn about the nervous and hormonal systems that cause our physiological responses to stress, and how they are related to chronic disease. Research shows that improving our EQ skills can help mediate these reactions in the body, possibly leading to both a safer stress response and better health overall. x
    • 20
      Emotion Regulation Disorders
      Heightened emotional experience—a common characteristic of anxiety and depression—could potentially be helped by EQ skills. Learn how Dialectical Behavior Therapy and the relatively new Emotion Regulation Therapy address certain common elements and skill deficiencies in a variety of “distress disorders,” regardless of specific diagnosis. x
    • 21
      Behavior Change and EQ
      If you’ve ever tried to change a significant behavior—quit smoking, lose weight, be more patient with your co-workers—you know how very difficult it can be. But you’ll be ahead of the game if you consider the role your emotions play in your behavioral choices and motivation. Learn how to improve your self-efficacy and develop a plan of “SMART” goals. x
    • 22
      Chronic Disease and EQ
      Medical professionals have long known that a patient's emotions play a key role in accepting and managing a diagnosis of chronic disease. But recent research reveals additional relationships between EQ and health-oriented behaviors. Explore the specific ways in which EQ can affect the management of two widespread chronic health problems: alcohol-use disorders and cardiovascular disease. x
    • 23
      Emotional Intelligence in Health Care
      Have you ever left a medical appointment feeling angry, frustrated, or even insulted? Whether it was the content of the meeting or the personalities involved that caused your frustration, you can learn how to improve your healthcare interactions by better understanding and monitoring your emotions—and those of your healthcare provider. x
    • 24
      The Future of Emotional Intelligence
      Does technology help or hurt our EQ? On the one hand, we all know the difficulty of accurately perceiving emotions when communicating by email, text, or other electronic platforms. But surprising advances in facial recognition, physiological response monitoring, and other software offer exciting and helpful futuristic options in the quest to improve our EQ. x
  • The American West: History, Myth, and Legacy

    Professor Patrick N. Allitt, Ph.D.

    Available Formats: Video Download, Audio Download, DVD, CD

    Designed to shine a light on the American frontier, The American West: History, Myth, and Legacy reveals the grit and grandeur of an epic period in U.S. history. In 24 lectures, award-winning Professor Patrick N. Allitt uncovers new historical angles on everything from the last stand at the Alamo to the Oregon Trail to the creation of America’s first national parks.

    View Lecture List (24)
    24 Lectures  |  The American West: History, Myth, and Legacy
    Lecture Titles (24)
    • 1
      Westward the Course of Empire
      What are some of the ways we think about the American West? How did this vast, fascinating region come into being, and how was it shaped by centuries of myth-making? What is it about westward expansion that has fascinated every generation of Americans? These and other questions are the topic of this introductory lecture. x
    • 2
      The West in the Colonial Era
      To understand the history of the American West, you have to understand the mark left by its earliest colonists. Among those you'll encounter here are the Spaniards (who introduced horses), the French (who developed a complex trade system), and the English (who, ironically, had little interest at first in colonizing west of the Appalachians). x
    • 3
      Venturing beyond the Appalachians
      After the Revolutionary War, the land between the Appalachians and the Mississippi became part of the new republic. How was this territory organized? As you'll learn, it started with the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, which created a set of new rules that came into conflict with complex old realities. x
    • 4
      Discoveries of Lewis and Clark
      Follow the fascinating journey of the two explorers who mapped the Louisiana Purchase between 1804 and 1806. Along the way, you'll learn how Lewis and Clark fit into the tradition of explorers looking for a water route to the Pacific, and you'll consider the political (and geographic) history of the Louisiana Purchase. x
    • 5
      The Fur Trade and the Mountain Men
      Fur traders and mountain men played an integral part in exploring and mapping the American West. Here, Professor Allitt reveals why fur was such a precious commodity; how John Jacob Astor dominated the American fur trade; and how famous mountaineers like Jedediah Smith, Jim Bridger, and Kit Carson became legends. x
    • 6
      Trail of Tears
      Turn now to one of the most dismal episodes in the story of the American West: the forced migration of the “Five Civilized Tribes” (Cherokee, Choctaw, Creek, Chickasaw, and Seminole) under the Indian Removal Act of 1830. It was this ordeal that the Cherokee came to call the “Trail of Tears.” x
    • 7
      Struggles of the Plains Indians
      From 1830 to 1890, the lives of the Plains Indians changed irrevocably. Topics include our sources for the early history of the Plains Indians (including portraits and archaeology), the importance of buffalo and horses to life on the Great Plains, and two visitors' perspectives on America's treatment of the Plains Indians. x
    • 8
      Rebellious Texas and the Alamo
      Get the full story behind the last stand at the Alamo and the story of the Texas republic. What led to tensions between the Mexican government and the growing United States? Why is the idea of rebellion so crucial to the myth of Texas? How did the territory eventually join the United States? x
    • 9
      Traveling the Oregon Trail
      The Oregon Trail has become a symbol of westward migration. In this lecture, Professor Allitt invites you to consider the challenges of the journey, as they were experienced by thousands of travelers. Among the most exceptional were Brigham Young's Mormons, fleeing persecution back East as they headed to Utah. x
    • 10
      Manifest Destiny and the Mexican War
      In 1846, the United States went to war with Mexico and, as a result, gained the whole of what is now the nation’s southwest region. Welcome to the era of “Manifest Destiny,” which, as you’ll learn, set the stage for the future of California, Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Nevada, and New Mexico. x
    • 11
      The California Gold Rush
      The California Gold Rush transformed the politics, demographics, and economy of the United States. It also, for the first time, gave the American West an irresistible mass appeal. Discover how the gold rush accelerated westward expansion and, in the process, established some of the first truly multicultural American communities. x
    • 12
      Bleeding Kansas and Civil War in the West
      Congress passed the Kansas-Nebraska Act in 1854, giving new states the right to decide their relationship with slave labor. Explore how this event led to a period of chronic anarchy and low-level warfare on the frontier, and how the American Civil War played out in the western states and territories. x
    • 13
      Building the Transcontinental Railroads
      For Professor Allitt, the great dividing line in the story of the American West is the construction of the transcontinental railroads, which did more than anything else to link the West with the Eastern states from which they’d emerged. Go inside the myths—and startling realities—of this decisive moment. x
    • 14
      Cowboys and Cattle Drives
      There is no greater symbol of the American West than the cowboy. But who were the cowboys, exactly? What were their everyday lives like? What did it take to go on a cattle drive along the Chisolm Trail? And why did the arrival of the farming frontier bring an end to the open range? x
    • 15
      Homesteaders on the Plains
      With the Homestead Act of 1862, public lands became available for anyone willing to settle and farm them. Enter the homesteaders. Explore the frustrations they faced in trying to cultivate the Great Plains, what fiction reveals about their emotions, and how farming difficulties led to the rise of the People's Party, or Populists. x
    • 16
      Little Bighorn and Wounded Knee
      Examine the period from 1865 to 1890, which marked the end of the Native American resistance to white domination. Two events form the core of this lecture. The first: the massacre of General Custer's cavalry at the Battle of Little Big Horn. The second: the massacre of the Lakota at the Battle of Wounded Knee. x
    • 17
      Life in Western Towns and Cities
      Survey the five main types of towns that developed in the American West: Spanish towns, mining towns, farming towns, railroad towns, and the Pacific coast cities. Three cities you'll explore in depth are Salt Lake City, laid out in 1847; Chicago, the central metropolis of the West; and the great port city of San Francisco. x
    • 18
      John Wesley Powell and the Desert Southwest
      Twenty years after the end of the Mexican War, thousands of square miles of desert land the U.S. received had yet to be mapped and settled. That's where John Wesley Powell came in, whose report on these arid regions sparked the rise of irrigation farming techniques that would lead to unimaginable bounty. x
    • 19
      Women in the Wild West
      What was life like for everyday women in the American West? Some were prostitutes. Others were missionaries. Others still were working- and middle-class women trying to recreate their lives back East. Ultimately, as you'll discover, the experience, while enlarging women's sphere of influence, was nevertheless a conservative one: to create a stable home. x
    • 20
      From Territories to Western States
      Imperfect and violent—two words to describe how Western territories were created and then transformed into states. In this lecture, go inside this intriguing, often misunderstood process, from the role of influential businesspeople to the copying of other state constitutions to the efforts to give women the right to vote. x
    • 21
      Western Violence, Law, and Order
      There is no doubt that the American West was a violent place. Why was this so? What kept the region from chaos and civil war? Professor Allitt's brief survey of violence explores the rise of vigilante justice, race riots against Mexicans and Chinese, and class conflict at coalmines. x
    • 22
      Protecting Yellowstone and Yosemite
      The American West is home to a magnificent series of national parks, two of the earliest of which (and, arguably, the greatest) are Yellowstone and Yosemite. Discover through these case studies how the idea of a park system came into existence through government action and the dedication of conservationists. x
    • 23
      Mythology of the American West
      Go inside the mythology of the American West, which kept the frontier alive after the U.S. Census Bureau declared in 1890 that it had disappeared. Examine historian Frederick Jackson Turner’s influential “frontier thesis.” Learn about the contributions of novelist Owen Wister and painter Frederic Remington. Also, explore the main categories of Western movies. x
    • 24
      Winning the West?
      When thinking about the American West, Professor Allitt stresses a balanced view that encompasses both the achievements and the sufferings of this period in American history. It's an insightful conclusion to the grand, fascinating, sometimes troubling story of how exactly America became a vast nation stretching from the Atlantic to the Pacific in just a century. x
  • Learning Statistics: Concepts and Applications in R

    Professor Talithia Williams, Ph.D.

    Available Formats: Video Download, DVD

    Taught by Professor Talithia Williams of Harvey Mudd College, this course surveys college-level statistics through dozens of exercises conducted in R, a free statistical programming language with millions of users worldwide. From describing and visualizing the data you have, to methods such as ANOVA and multiple regression for reaching broader inferences, you learn the most widely used statistical measures, concepts, and techniques.

    View Lecture List (24)
    24 Lectures  |  Learning Statistics: Concepts and Applications in R
    Lecture Titles (24)
    • 1
      How to Summarize Data with Statistics
      Confront how ALL data has uncertainty, and why statistics is a powerful tool for reaching insights and solving problems. Begin by describing and summarizing data with the help of concepts such as the mean, median, variance, and standard deviation. Learn common statistical notation and graphing techniques, and get a preview of the programming language R, which will be used throughout the course. x
    • 2
      Exploratory Data Visualization in R
      Dip into R, which is a popular open-source programming language for use in statistics and data science. Consider the advantages of R over spreadsheets. Walk through the installation of R, installation of a companion IDE (integrated development environment) RStudio, and how to download specialized data packages from within RStudio. Then, try out simple operations, learning how to import data, save your work, and generate different plots. x
    • 3
      Sampling and Probability
      Study sampling and probability, which are key aspects of how statistics handles the uncertainty inherent in all data. See how sampling aims for genuine randomness in the gathering of data, and probability provides the tools for calculating the likelihood of a given event based on that data. Solve a range of problems in probability, including a case of medical diagnosis that involves the application of Bayes' theorem. x
    • 4
      Discrete Distributions
      There's more than one way to be truly random! Delve deeper into probability by surveying several discrete probability distributions—those defined by discrete variables. Examples include Bernoulli, binomial, geometric, negative binomial, and Poisson distributions—each tailored to answer a specific question. Get your feet wet by analyzing several sets of data using these tools. x
    • 5
      Continuous and Normal Distributions
      Focus on the normal distribution, which is the most celebrated type of continuous probability distribution. Characterized by a bell-shaped curve that is symmetrical around the mean, the normal distribution shows up in a wide range of phenomena. Use R to find percentiles, probabilities, and other properties connected with this ubiquitous data pattern. x
    • 6
      Covariance and Correlation
      When are two variables correlated? Learn how to measure covariance, which is the association between two random variables. Then use covariance to obtain a dimensionless number called the correlation coefficient. Using an R data set, plot correlation values for several variables, including the physical measurements of a sample population. x
    • 7
      Validating Statistical Assumptions
      Graphical data analysis was once cumbersome and time-consuming, but that has changed with programming tools such as R. Analyze the classic Iris Flower Data Set—the standard for testing statistical classification techniques. See if you can detect a pattern in sepal and petal dimensions for different species of irises by using scatterplots, histograms, box plots, and other graphical tools. x
    • 8
      Sample Size and Sampling Distributions
      It’s rarely possible to collect all the data from a population. Learn how to get a lot from a little by “bootstrapping,” a technique that lets you improve an estimate by resampling the same data set over and over. It sounds like magic, but it works! Test tools such as the Q-Q plot and the Shapiro-Wilk test, and learn how to apply the central limit theorem. x
    • 9
      Point Estimates and Standard Error
      Take your understanding of descriptive techniques to the next level, as you begin your study of statistical inference, learning how to extract information from sample data. In this lecture, focus on the point estimate—a single number that provides a sensible value for a given parameter. Consider how to obtain an unbiased estimator, and discover how to calculate the standard error for this estimate. x
    • 10
      Interval Estimates and Confidence Intervals
      Move beyond point estimates to consider the confidence interval, which provides a range of possible values. See how this tool gives an accurate estimate for a large population by sampling a relatively small subset of individuals. Then learn about the choice of confidence level, which is often specified as 95%. Investigate what happens when you adjust the confidence level up or down. x
    • 11
      Hypothesis Testing: 1 Sample
      Having learned to estimate a given population parameter from sample data, now go the other direction, starting with a hypothesized parameter for a population and determining whether we think a given sample could have come from that population. Practice this important technique, called hypothesis testing, with a single parameter, such as whether a lifestyle change reduces cholesterol. Discover the power of the p-value in gauging the significance of your result. x
    • 12
      Hypothesis Testing: 2 Samples, Paired Test
      Extend the method of hypothesis testing to see whether data from two different samples could have come from the same population—for example, chickens on different feed types or an ice skater’s speed in two contrasting maneuvers. Using R, learn how to choose the right tool to differentiate between independent and dependent samples. One such tool is the matched pairs t-test. x
    • 13
      Linear Regression Models and Assumptions
      Step into fully modeling the relationship between data with the most common technique for this purpose: linear regression. Using R and data on the growth of wheat under differing amounts of rainfall, test different models against criteria for determining their validity. Cover common pitfalls when fitting a linear model to data. x
    • 14
      Regression Predictions, Confidence Intervals
      What do you do if your data doesn't follow linear model assumptions? Learn how to transform the data to eliminate increasing or decreasing variance (called heteroscedasticity), thereby satisfying the assumptions of normality, independence, and linearity. One of your test cases uses the R data set for miles per gallon versus weight in 1973-74 model automobiles. x
    • 15
      Multiple Linear Regression
      Multiple linear regression lets you deal with data that has multiple predictors. Begin with an R data set on diabetes in Pima Indian women that has an array of potential predictors. Evaluate these predictors for significance. Then turn to data where you fit a multiple regression model by adding explanatory variables one by one. Learn to avoid overfitting, which happens when too many explanatory variables are included. x
    • 16
      Analysis of Variance: Comparing 3 Means
      Delve into ANOVA, short for analysis of variance, which is used for comparing three or more group means for statistical significance. ANOVA answers three questions: Do categories have an effect? How is the effect different across categories? Is this significant? Learn to apply the F-test and Tukey's honest significant difference (HSD) test. x
    • 17
      Analysis of Covariance and Multiple ANOVA
      You can combine features of regression and ANOVA to perform what is called analysis of covariance, or ANCOVA. And that's not all: Just as you can extend simple linear regression to multiple linear regression, you can also extend ANOVA to multiple ANOVA, known as MANOVA, or multivariate analysis of variance. Learn when to apply each of these techniques. x
    • 18
      Statistical Design of Experiments
      While a creative statistical analysis can sometime salvage a poorly designed experiment, gain an understanding of how experiments can be designed in from the outset to collect far more reliable statistical data. Consider the role of randomization, replication, blocking, and other criteria, along with the use of ANOVA to analyze the results. Work several examples in R. x
    • 19
      Regression Trees and Classification Trees
      Delve into decision trees, which are graphs that use a branching method to determine all possible outcomes of a decision. Trees for continuous outcomes are called regression trees, while those for categorical outcomes are called classification trees. Learn how and when to use each, producing inferences that are easily understood by non-statisticians. x
    • 20
      Polynomial and Logistic Regression
      What can be done with data when transformations and tree algorithms don't work? One approach is polynomial regression, a form of regression analysis in which the relationship between the independent and dependent variables is modelled as the power of a polynomial. Step functions fit smaller, local models instead of one global model. Or, if we have binary data, there is logistic regression, in which the response variable has categorical values such as true/false or 0/1. x
    • 21
      Spatial Statistics
      Spatial analysis is a set of statistical tools used to find additional order and patterns in spatial phenomena. Drawing on libraries for spatial analysis in R, use a type of graph called a semivariogram to plot the spatial autocorrelation of the measured sample points. Try your hand at data sets involving the geographic incidence of various medical conditions. x
    • 22
      Time Series Analysis
      Time series analysis provides a way to model response data that is correlated with itself, from one point in time to the next, such as daily stock prices or weather history. After disentangling seasonal changes from longer-term patterns, consider methods that can model a dependency on time, collectively known as ARIMA (autoregressive integrated moving average) models. x
    • 23
      Prior Information and Bayesian Inference
      Turn to an entirely different approach for doing statistical inference: Bayesian statistics, which assumes a known prior probability and updates the probability based on the accumulation of additional data. Unlike the frequentist approach, the Bayesian method does not depend on an infinite number of hypothetical repetitions. Explore the flexibility of Bayesian analysis. x
    • 24
      Statistics Your Way with Custom Functions
      Close the course by learning how to write custom functions for your R programs, streamlining operations, enhancing graphics, and putting R to work in a host of other ways. Professor Williams also supplies tips on downloading and exporting data, and making use of the rich resources for R—a truly powerful tool for understanding and interpreting data in whatever way you see fit. x
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