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  • How to Sing
    Course  |  How to Sing

    Professor Dawn Pierce, AD

    Available Formats: Instant Video, DVD
    These expertly designed lessons break down the elements of voice technique into graspable steps, guiding you to build solid skills as a singer and to express yourself through any kind of music or style. In this course, you’ll learn how to find freedom of movement and flexibility in the vocal mechanism; produce clear tone; develop resonance; and interpret a text and communicate your connections to it in your singing.
    View Lecture List (24)
    These expertly designed lessons break down the elements of voice technique into graspable steps, guiding you to build solid skills as a singer and to express yourself through any kind of music or style. In this course, you’ll learn how to find freedom of movement and flexibility in the vocal mechanism; produce clear tone; develop resonance; and interpret a text and communicate your connections to it in your singing.
    View Lecture List (24)
    24 Lectures  |  How to Sing
    Lecture Titles (24)
    • 1
      Anyone Can Sing
      Begin the course with a first look at the physiology of singing, as it represents a refined coordination of posture, breath, and tone. Learn about the approach you'll study in this course, based in a thorough view of the science of singing, as well as the art of vocal expression. Then practice basic vocalizations for freeing the voice and testing your range, and finish with a familiar song. x
    • 2
      Vocal Warm-Ups
      Learn effective vocal warmups, to build proper coordination and balance for your most beautiful singing. Consider the physiological benefits of warmups, and how to care for your vocal instrument. To begin, practice full-body warmup exercises. Follow this with vocal exercises for energizing your breath, engaging with tone, sharpening vocal agility and vowel production, and increasing resonance and range. x
    • 3
      Aligning the Spine
      A flexible alignment is the foundation for solid vocal technique. Study the structure of the spine and practice exercises to find a free and dynamic posture for your best sound production. Examine lower body and pelvic alignment and note how these affect your singing. Also learn how slightly elevating the sternum and strengthening the back and shoulder muscles help free the breath. x
    • 4
      Head and Neck Posture
      Explore head and neck alignment that support a freely functioning vocal mechanism. Visualize the cervical spine and its seven vertebrae, and grasp why head position is crucial for ease in vocal vibration. Practice a range of movements and exercises to experience how vocal tone is affected by head posture, to learn how to maintain a free neck alignment, and to find your optimal, dynamic posture for singing. x
    • 5
      How to Practice Anything
      Regular and effective practice is crucial for developing your singing skills. Study three primary facets of efficient practice: Evaluate your progress; strategize a plan of action, and integrate your new skills. Grasp what a typical practice session will look like, from your warmup and assigned exercises to applying your new abilities to the music. Also, remember to sing for fun! x
    • 6
      The Anatomy and Physiology of Breath
      Now focus on the respiratory system, a foundational element for singing. Get to know the organs and structures that come into play when you sing: the airway, the lungs, the muscles of respiration, and the motions of inhalation and exhalation. Work with exercises to increase flexibility, lung capacity, and the function of your breathing, with both immediate and long-term benefits for singing. x
    • 7
      Inhalation for Singing
      Take a closer look at the important role of inhalation in vocal technique. Explore three kinds of breath: clavicular (the upper chest), thoracic (the ribcage), and diaphragmatic (the lower abdomen). Then practice a gentle, three-part yoga breath that uses all of them. Next, apply this holistic way of breathing to a song, maintaining a dynamic posture and guiding your inhalation to release low into your body. x
    • 8
      Exhalation for Singing
      In vocal technique, consider how the quality of the exhalation determines the quality of the inhalation. Study the appoggio technique, which focuses on encouraging sternum elevation and rib position during the exhalation. Practice exercises to maintain an open upper body and suspend the inclination to collapse on the exhale, releasing the inhalation and engaging appoggio on the exhale. x
    • 9
      Coordinating the Phases of Breath
      This lesson breaks down breathing into four phases associated with singing: inhalation, suspension, exhalation, and recovery. Work with exercises to coordinate these phases to create habitual patterns for breath. Using the song chosen for this lesson, experiment with how to make decisions about where you will breathe and divide the phrases. Then learn specific tools to troubleshoot aspects of breathing and posture that may be challenging. x
    • 10
      Sound Production
      Take an overview of the anatomy and structure of the larynx: the cartilage, ligaments, and muscles that house and support the vocal cords. Then look at how phonation or sound production works, and how pitch is made. Explore phonation through a series of exercises, working to create a healthy vocal tone and a balanced, free laryngeal position, without extraneous tensions. x
    • 11
      Onset: Engaging Balanced Tone
      In singing, the ideal initiation of sound creates a clear, clean tone. Look at the spectrum of ways to start tone, beginning with aspiration, or breathiness." Contrast this with a glottal "plosive" onset and see how both can fatigue the voice. Work with exercises to find an easy, more neutral, and efficiently balanced onset of sound, with minimal effort. Apply this work, using the song "Amazing Grace."" x
    • 12
      Resonance: Exploring Vocal Colors
      Grasp how the vocal tract acts as a resonator and study the physiology of the three main areas of vocal resonance. Learn to shape and control your resonance through exercises that explore vibration in the internal spaces of the vocal tract, creating different sounds and colors. Work to achieve a well-balanced resonance throughout your range, maintaining awareness of the internal spaces. x
    • 13
      Utilizing the Soft Palate
      Examine the role of the soft palate in singing. Locate the position of the palate and learn about its physiological functions. Work with mental imagery that will naturally activate and lift the soft palate, and discover how the soft palate affects vocal sound. Using helpful materials and props, work to engage with a more flexible, agile palate, which will respond naturally when you sing. x
    • 14
      Releasing Jaw Tension
      Consider why jaw tension is undesirable for healthy and natural voice production. Study the parts of the of the jaw, the muscles that control jaw movement, and the motion of the jaw hinge. Work to cultivate a free and neutral jaw position, exploring the release of internal muscles. Using a song, find how the jaw can move independently of vowels, pitch, and the movement of the tongue. x
    • 15
      Your Voice Type
      Begin to explore your voice category, and learn a general way to classify your voice, with the goal of making the most of your own vocal mechanism and choosing repertoire that allows you to shine. Study vocal registration," encompassing what are called chest voice, head voice, and falsetto. Find the point where your own voice shifts registers, as a guideline for understanding your voice type." x
    • 16
      Maximizing Your Vocal Range
      With regular practice and solid technique, you can learn to develop and maximize your natural range. Start by further exercising your range. Then explore self-massage of the muscles and joints around the larynx, and work with exercises to develop flexibility in these muscles to expand and unite your range. Using The Star-Spangled Banner," experiment with breath, phrasing, and the large range of the song." x
    • 17
      Training Your Tongue
      Freedom and release of the tongue are essential to healthy vocal technique. Learn about the anatomy of the tongue and its eight muscles and how excess tongue tension is common for singers. Do a series of exercises to work for freedom and to let go of any pushing, retracting, or pressure on the larynx. Over time, explore the effects of these tools and incorporate them into your practicing. x
    • 18
      Articulating Vowels
      Look into vowel production in singing and how independence of the articulators (the jaw, tongue, and lips) can help to maximize vocal freedom and flexibility. Practice forming vowels without jaw engagement. Learn about the International Phonetic Alphabet, which represents speech sounds. Then work with exercises to form tongue vowels, lip vowels, and diphthongs, bringing them into another fun, original song. x
    • 19
      Articulating Consonants
      Take a deep dive into the classification of consonants and how they function in singing. Work with eight categories of consonants and discover both where they are formed within the vocal tract and how they are formed by the articulators. Explore voiced and unvoiced consonants, as they relate to sustained tone, and apply your knowledge to the poetic text of a song. x
    • 20
      Diction for Singing
      Clear diction and phrasing are fundamental to vocal artistry. In this lesson, explore how we communicate meaning through pronunciation and syllabic stress. Begin to work with phrasing, how words are stressed relative to each other, and which words to emphasize as important. Consider how to place vowels and consonants in a sung phrase, and start to address intention and meaning in singing text. x
    • 21
      Engaging with Lyrics
      In approaching lyrics, study how to interpret the text. Begin by researching the piece, learning about the librettist, the time period, and the historical context. Also research the composer and how the piece was written. Using the text of an original song, and your character analysis worksheet, work to find your own expressive connection with the piece and create your interpretation of the song. x
    • 22
      Communicating through Song
      Bring your vocal skills to the areas of expression and performance. Grasp the importance of aligning your intention with the message your listeners are receiving. Explore how factors such as posture, facial expressions, physical gestures, vocal resonance, and articulation all communicate. Sing Auld Lang Syne," and practice communicating different attitudes and expressive intentions." x
    • 23
      Making Each Performance Personal
      Study core principles of vocal artistry in performance. Learn ways to connect imaginatively with your text and character, to believe in what you're communicating, and to share your unique perspective as a performer. Working with the song Danny Boy," see how sight, sound, and touch feed your imaginative work, and how specificity in your artistic choices gives your work depth and authenticity." x
    • 24
      Singing's Surprising Benefits
      Having arrived at the end of this course, reflect on your work and consider the physical and mental health benefits that singing brings, including the specific physiological effects of singing and how the lifestyle of singing encourages good choices for overall health and well-being. Conclude by singing a final original song, applying everything you've learned, then embrace the goal of scheduling a performance. x
  • Exploring the Mayan World

    Professor Edwin Barnhart, Ph.D.

    Available Formats: Instant Video, DVD
    Visually compelling and unlike anything The Great Courses has produced before, Exploring the Mayan World feels like your favorite travel show. In eight immersive episodes, decode cultural messages hidden in ancient Maya sites; explore the legacy of Spanish interactions with the Maya as they are reflected in modern towns; chat with archaeologists, artisans, and other local experts; and witness the Maya legacy in food, music, fashion, and art.
    View Lecture List (8)
    Visually compelling and unlike anything The Great Courses has produced before, Exploring the Mayan World feels like your favorite travel show. In eight immersive episodes, decode cultural messages hidden in ancient Maya sites; explore the legacy of Spanish interactions with the Maya as they are reflected in modern towns; chat with archaeologists, artisans, and other local experts; and witness the Maya legacy in food, music, fashion, and art.
    View Lecture List (8)
    8 Lectures  |  Exploring the Mayan World
    Lecture Titles (8)
    • 1
      Mérida
      Start your adventures in the Maya world with a trip to Mérida: the capital of Yucatán and the cultural capital of the entire peninsula. You’ll visit a factory in a run-down hacienda where they’re reviving the industry that made the Yucatán so rich more than 100 years ago; explore the mega-mansions lining Mérida’s Paseo de Mont; and go shopping for the perfect hammock and guayabera shirt. x
    • 2
      Chichén Itzá
      First, travel to Izamal, the “yellow city” named after the Maya sky god. Here, you’ll tour the city’s rich history—including a hike up a pyramid as high as a 10-story building and a walk through the Convent of St. Anthony of Padua, designed as a Christian teaching tool for the Maya. Then, venture on to Chichén Itzá, where you’ll get up close and personal with magnificent achievements of Maya architecture, including an observatory, a ceremonial ball court, and a sacred cenote. x
    • 3
      Ek’ Balam
      Join Dr. Barnhart for a trip to two of his favorite places in the Yucatán: Valladolid and Ek’ Balam. The first is a city established on the foundations of a Maya city called Zací and offers travelers a chance to see a traditional agave distillery and an all-female troop of competitive horseback riders. The second is the well-preserved ruins of what was once a Maya capital, and it’s where you’ll witness fantastic stucco facades and reenactors demonstrating musical instruments and the Maya ball game. x
    • 4
      Tihosuco
      More fun in the Maya world awaits in this fascinating episode where you’ll accompany Dr. Barnhart as he writes his name in Maya hieroglyphs, talks to howler monkeys, plunges into a geological cathedral, and more. It’s all part of his journey to Tihosuco, home to perhaps the largest episode in world history of an oppressed people fighting for their independence. Sites you’ll visit include the Cenote Suytun, Punta Laguna National Park, the Caste War Museum, and the Iglesia de Santo Niño Jesus. x
    • 5
      Mayapán
      Around 1250, Mayapán replaced Chichén Itzá as the new capital of the Yucatán—and one founded on a league of representational government. In this episode, you’ll get a chance to explore the rich history and culture of the site and its surrounding region. Learn about the infamous destruction of sacred Maya codices during public acts of faith held by the Spanish friar Diego de Landa, sample delicious dishes of grilled pork and ground pumpkin seeds, and spend some time looking over the shoulder of a ceramic artist working to keep Maya artistic traditions alive in the 21st century through reproductions of ancient pottery. x
    • 6
      Uxmal
      Discover what makes Uxmal such a marvel of Maya urban planning. Dr. Barnhart walks you through archaeological features, including the Pyramid of the Dwarf, the Palace of the Governors, and the Nunnery Quadrangle. Plus, spend some time exploring the Loltun Caves: a site that was once used for religious meditation and rituals, and where you'll find handprints dating back 10,000 years. Cap off your adventure with a sampling of hot chocolate-made the traditional Maya way. x
    • 7
      Celestún
      Your first stop in this episode is Kabáh, the second-largest ruin featuring the Puuc architectural style, where you’ll find over 200 faces of Chaac the rain god and a rare example of literate public art. Next, visit Bécal, famous for producing some of the best jipijapas (or, as tourists call them, panama hats) in the Yucatán. Finally, take a trip to the Celestún biosphere, a wetland reserve spanning some 150,000 acres that’s famous for the thousands of flamingos that flock there. x
    • 8
      Labná
      Labná, the last of the ancient sites you’ll hit on this trip, is an architectural wonder crowned by the three buildings everyone comes here to see: the Palacio, the El Mirador pyramid, and the Labná Arch. After decoding the cultural messages in these famous works, travel back to Mérida, where your journey began. Here, you’ll follow Dr. Barnhart through the Gran Museo del Mundo Maya, watch him sample modern takes on traditional Maya cuisine at a boutique hotel and spa, and catch an evening revival of a Maya ball game in Mérida’s central square. x
  • Shocking Psychological Studies and the Lessons They Teach

    Professor Thad A. Polk, Ph.D.

    Available Formats: Instant Video, DVD
    In the six lectures of Shocking Psychological Studies and the Lessons They Teach, you will explore a range of ethically compromised psychological experiments from the past that have nonetheless contributed significant insight into the human condition. Dr. Polk spells out the contemporary ethical principles now in place to protect both subjects and science, but also examines why every new technological and scientific advancement brings a new set of ethical conundrums for us to grapple with.
    View Lecture List (6)
    In the six lectures of Shocking Psychological Studies and the Lessons They Teach, you will explore a range of ethically compromised psychological experiments from the past that have nonetheless contributed significant insight into the human condition. Dr. Polk spells out the contemporary ethical principles now in place to protect both subjects and science, but also examines why every new technological and scientific advancement brings a new set of ethical conundrums for us to grapple with.
    View Lecture List (6)
    6 Lectures  |  Shocking Psychological Studies and the Lessons They Teach
    Lecture Titles (6)
    • 1
      Lessons from Tuskegee and Facebook
      Today, research with human subjects is guided by a set of three ethical principles of the 1976 Belmont Report, but that was not always the case. In the first lecture of this six-lecture course, Professor Polk explores the famous Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment and how its ethical violations ultimately led to the development of the Belmont Report and the ethical principles it identified. x
    • 2
      Pushing Good People to Do Bad Things
      Why do good people sometimes do bad things? Professor Polk encourages us to grapple with two of the most famous psychological studies on ethics and human psychology: Milgram's Obedience Study and the Stanford Prison Experiment. Each study offers invaluable lessons about human behavior. Look at the ways that these explorations into the causes of unethical human behavior were, themselves, astonishingly unethical. x
    • 3
      Experimenting on Vulnerable Children
      Arguably, the most vulnerable people in any population are the children. Childhood development studies can also provide invaluable insights into human psychology. Here, explore two studies where children were the focus: Neubauer’s twin study and Johnson’s “Monster Study” of testing the origins of stuttering. Discover why, according to the Belmont Report’s principles, these “subjects” might be identified more accurately as “victims.” x
    • 4
      Testing Psychochemical Weapons
      Government organizations such as the CIA and military are charged with protecting the public, but in these shocking experiments, vulnerable low-ranking soldiers and psychiatric patients were unwittingly subjected to psychoactive drugs. Uncover the ways in which these observational studies lacked both rigorous scientific design and adherence to any of the Belmont Report's principles. In fact, the results of these studies often led to hallucinations, paranoia, rage, and even death. x
    • 5
      Assigning Gender and Spying on Sex
      Studies of sex and sexual identity present unique ethical challenges for privacy and consent. In the next two studies, Professor Polk takes you into the private world of sexual identity and impulse. The Tearoom Trade Study considers the public identities and private choices of anonymous public sex participants. The John/Joan case explores the sexual identity of a biologically male child raised as a female. x
    • 6
      Current and Future Ethical Challenges
      Science still grapples with the ethics of studying human subjects. Increasingly, data is available about every aspect of human life through our uninhibited interactions with technology. The study of such data sets is affordable, widely generalizable, and easily accessible. But is it ethical? You'll also discover that the conclusions presented in scientific journals, even under our more rigorous ethical guidelines, may not be as reliable as we thought. x
  • Fundamentals of DSLR Filmmaking

    Instructor Victor Ha,

    Available Formats: Instant Video, DVD
    Get creative with your DSLR camera and explore the core techniques of DSLR filmmaking with Fundamentals of DSLR Filmmaking. From framing shots and choosing lenses to setting up lights and recording sound, these 39 engaging in-studio lessons will leave you prepared and inspired to get out there and shoot your own exciting, high-quality film projects.
    View Lecture List (39)
    Get creative with your DSLR camera and explore the core techniques of DSLR filmmaking with Fundamentals of DSLR Filmmaking. From framing shots and choosing lenses to setting up lights and recording sound, these 39 engaging in-studio lessons will leave you prepared and inspired to get out there and shoot your own exciting, high-quality film projects.
    View Lecture List (39)
    39 Lectures  |  Fundamentals of DSLR Filmmaking
    Lecture Titles (39)
    • 1
      Introduction to Filmmaking
      In this introductory lesson, learn why filmmaking is all about storytelling. Using two silent videos as examples, determine the story from the way the video is shot, framed, and edited. x
    • 2
      Shooting for the Edit, Part 1
      When shooting the story you want to tell, don't throw caution to the wind and hope it all works out. Instead, learn how to think about different shots and perspectives-even when filming something as mundane as making a peanut butter sandwich. x
    • 3
      Shooting for the Edit, Part 2
      Should the number of your shots depend on the mood of your video? What about B-roll footage that doesn't necessarily relate to the story? How much room do you leave before and after a scene for editing? Gets answers to these and other questions. x
    • 4
      Camera Basics, Part 1
      In this first lesson on DSLR camera basics, Mr. Ha picks four different DSLR camera types and breaks them out into their individual strengths and weakness. They include: a full-frame camera, an APS-C camera, an APS-H camera, and a Micro 4/3 camera. x
    • 5
      Camera Basics, Part 2
      Continue exploring DSLR camera basics with a focus on, well, focusing. Mr. Ha reveals some best practices he likes to use and offers insights into how different lenses work to help filmmakers zero in on what's most important in a shot. x
    • 6
      Preferred Camera Settings with Q&A
      In this lesson, Mr. Ha runs through the ways he sets his DSLR camera up for success. Along the way, you'll cover such menu options as Custom White Balance and Image Stabilization, as well as Custom Picture Styles like Technicolor and CineStyle. x
    • 7
      A Video a Day
      Practice, as they say, makes perfect. And that's equally true when we're talking about DSLR filmmaking. Here, discover how shooting one simple video every day using your smartphone can help hone your inner filmmaker's eye. x
    • 8
      180-Degree Rule
      In this lesson on the importance of establishing shots (your film's introductory paragraph"), make sense of the "180-degree rule" when filming two subjects on screen. This simple rule helps you place your subjects in frame-without confusing your viewers." x
    • 9
      Thinking in Sequences
      So, you've got your perfect establishing shot. What comes next? A hard cut? A jump cut? Here, learn how to use insert and cutaway footage to build out sequences that enhance your narrative, and to soften transitions and make your film more cinematic. x
    • 10
      Movement with Monopods
      Transitioning to motion and film can be difficult for photographers because it requires them to step away from their camera. Enter the monopod: a mobile, versatile tool that allows you to tap into movements like rocking-and-panning and push-in focus. x
    • 11
      Movement with Video Tripods
      Consider the benefits of working with video tripods. You'll explore the ball-bowl combination, which lets you stay level on an uneven surface, and the counterbalance feature, which acts as something of a camera spotter. Then, zoom in on the look and feel of different camera movements. x
    • 12
      Movement with Sliders
      In this lesson, Mr. Ha uses video examples to teach you how to get the most out of your camera sliders. Topics include shooting in layers (foreground, middle ground, background) and choosing the right slider length based on what you're filming. x
    • 13
      Breaking into Video with Hybrid Portraits
      Hybrid portraits are a short, 30-second combination of stills and motion. Think of them as vanity pieces designed to grab someone's attention. Learn why, for photographers who've never shot motion before, hybrid portraits make for a great place to start. x
    • 14
      The Portrait Film
      Unlike hybrid portraits, portrait films are comprised entirely of motion. So, what makes for a good portrait film? One sign is that you can pause the portrait film in any frame and have a well-composed photograph. Learn some other tips and tricks in this lesson. x
    • 15
      The Hybrid Wedding and Wedding Film
      In this lesson, tackle a wedding shoot from two different perspectives. The first is a hybrid wedding film that can usually be done by a single person. The second is a traditional wedding film that's a multiperson, multicamera job. x
    • 16
      The Corporate Profile
      Being able to shoot a solid corporate profile can open up a lot of doors for you as a DSLR filmmaker. Taking you from pre-interview to post-production, Mr. Ha shows you how to capture someone talking about their business in the space of just two minutes. x
    • 17
      Basics of Sound
      Along with thinking about visuals as a DSLR filmmaker, you need to think about sound, whether it's background noise at a party or the answer to an interview question. Examine the differences between sound (which is captured) and audio (which is played back). x
    • 18
      Microphones and Their Differences
      There are many types of microphones out there for recording sound. So, what's the one that's right for your project? Focus on two types: directional (which capture sound from a single direction) and omni-directional (which capture sound from multiple directions). x
    • 19
      Picking the Right Microphone
      Every microphone, says Mr. Ha, has a personality-a different way it picks up sound. As you'll learn in this lesson on microphones and sound recorders, it's not about how much money you spend, but about finding one that has a solid sound-capturing technique. x
    • 20
      Double System Sound
      Double system sound means you're capturing sound to another device that's not your DSLR camera. That also means you've automatically dedicated yourself in post-production to doing what's called syncing. Mr. Ha demonstrates how it all works here. x
    • 21
      Hi-Hats and Low-Hats
      Hi-hats, low-hats, gorilla pods, GoPros. In this lesson, take a look at footage that's shot with some of these tools noted for their stability and versatility. In addition to learning how to work with these helpful filmmaking tools, get insights on what situations are right for which ones. x
    • 22
      Handheld Stabilization with Q&A
      Dive into the world of handheld stabilization, from Steadicams to glide cams to extremely expensive tools. Among the tips you'll get are the three points of contact you need to make with your camera (and gear) when moving with it in your hands. x
    • 23
      Timelapse
      Here, Mr. Ha shows you the right way to do two-hour time lapses based on his experiences out in the field. They key is manual exposure, manual focus, and manual white balance. Also, take a peek at an app that takes the math aspect out of time lapse shooting. x
    • 24
      Lensbaby, Copters, and 4K
      First, explore how Lensbaby footage can add layers of instability to your narrative. Second, discover the perspectival impact of aerial footage from drones like quadcopters and hexicopters. Lastly, investigate some of the amazing things you can accomplish with 4K capture. x
    • 25
      Using Your Current Photographic Tools for Video
      If you're a photographer, chances are you already have plenty of tools you've invested time and money into buying and learning. But you can use many of these tools for video, as well. Learn how to work with these common photography tools in both worlds. x
    • 26
      DSLR Filmmaking Tools, Part 1
      In the first of two lessons on DSLR filmmaking tools, join Mr. Ha for a spirited look at the essentials you'll need to succeed on your next shoot. These tools include light meters for two types of metering, lenses for different budgets and tastes, and lens adaptors. x
    • 27
      DSLR Filmmaking Tools, Part 2
      Continue exploring essential DSLR filmmaking tools. Now, learn the importance of external monitors that show what your camera's seeing, lens gears that allow for a tactile experience with your lenses, and focusing tools to achieve choreographed movements. x
    • 28
      Lighting 101
      If you understand the fundamentals of lighting and start by learning them from the ground up, you're going to become a much better lighting technician in the future. Here, Mr. Ha focuses on ambient light to illustrate how patterns of daylight can have a powerful impact on your image. x
    • 29
      Ambient Light, Part 1
      What's the difference between short lighting and broad lighting? What about the difference between key light and fill light? How do you deal with light in situations like weddings, where your subjects are constantly moving around? Find out here. x
    • 30
      Ambient Light, Part 2
      Continue exploring the beauty of ambient light-and the skills needed to make it work for your next project. Central to this lesson are Mr. Ha's insights on working with shadows and manipulating them to highlight your subject and even create different moods. x
    • 31
      Soundtracks for Dummies, Part 1
      What does your story sound like? That's where soundtracks come in. In the first of two lessons on the topic, skip the legalese and focus on how to choose the right soundtrack for your content. And it all starts by picking three words to guide your search. x
    • 32
      Soundtracks for Dummies, Part 2
      Delve into more topics related to film soundtracks. Learn the pros and cons of going with your gut when choosing music, when to pick a song with vocals versus instrumentals, and where to find affordable music with the correct rights. x
    • 33
      Lighting 102
      Come back to lighting and learn how to make it less intimidating by breaking it down into more manageable pieces. In this lesson, consider the benefits and drawbacks to all types of lighting, from HMI and tungsten lights to florescent and LED lights. x
    • 34
      One-Light Setup
      How do you work with an economic setup involving just one light? What are some of the options you have? Mr. Ha discusses several of them here, including a butterfly light (which you see a lot of in older movies) and a clam shell light (which helps fill shadows). x
    • 35
      Two- and Three-Light Setup
      You know how to work with one-light setups. Now move up to two- and three-light setups and all the different ways they allow you to play with shadows and light. Mr. Ha's studio demonstrations prove especially helpful for understanding the intricacies of these setups. x
    • 36
      Lighting Q&A
      In this helpful Q&A session, Mr. Ha fields audience questions about lighting. You'll learn how much lighting is truly necessary for the average person, what kind of light stands to take with you on location, the right ISO to aim for when shooting indoors, and more. x
    • 37
      Corporate Profile Pre-Production
      Mr. Ha walks you step by step through the pre-production process for a hypothetical corporate profile of a gym, harnessing everything you've learned in the preceding lessons. It's the perfect chance to break apart the nuances involved in getting a project off the ground. x
    • 38
      Storyboarding, Shot List, and Gear List
      To visually imagine your corporate profile, you need storyboards and shot lists. Learn strategies for creating both-and sharing them with a client. Also, learn how to build a comprehensive gear list so you have what you need to bring those storyboards to life. x
    • 39
      Callsheet, Crew, and Sound
      On many shoots, you'll likely work with multiple people on both the talent and client sides. Not to mention a range of locations and times. In this concluding lesson, learn how to better manage talent and crew so your production can run as efficiently as possible. x